Video: Use Unit Test Triangulation To Build Better Code

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There can be many strategies to building a solid, testable bit of code.  Triangulation is one of those strategies and in this video excerpt from Mark Seemann's new course Outside-In Test-Driven Development you'll see how to use a series of test to zero in on the proper code implementation.  In the full course Mark also covers spiking, behavior verification, and  characterization tests.


[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2xkb6sfH4wc?feature=player_detailpage]




Mark Seemann is a Danish programmer based in Copenhagen, Denmark. His professional interests include object-oriented development, functional programming, and software architecture, as well as software development in general. Apart from writing a book about Dependency Injection he has also written numerous articles and blog posts about related topics.  Despite being a .NET programmer he takes most of his inspiration from sources across a wide range of technologies, including lots of pattern books.

You can watch the full HD version of this video along with the other 2 hr 27 min of video found in this professional course by subscribing to Pluralsight. Visit Outside-In Test-Driven Development to view the full course outline. Pluralsight subscribers also benefit from cool features like mobile appsfull library searchprogress trackingexercise files,assessments, and offline viewing. Happy learning!

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Contributor

Paul Ballard

is a Chief Architect specializing in large scale distributed system development and enterprise software processes. Paul has more than twenty years of development experience including being a former Microsoft MVP, a speaker at technical conferences such as Microsoft Tech-Ed and VSLive, and a published author. Prior to working on the Windows platform, he built software using a vast array of technologies including Java, Unix, C, and even OS/2.