Creating Acceptance Tests With FitNesse

In this course we learn how to use the FitNesse test framework to create acceptance tests for Java and .NET projects.
Course info
Rating
(104)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 17, 2013
Duration
3h 10m
Table of contents
FitNesse Overview
Creating Fit Fixtures
Using The Slim Engine
Editing The Wiki
FitNesse In .NET
Description
Course info
Rating
(104)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 17, 2013
Duration
3h 10m
Description

Creating acceptance tests can be difficult in software development, because often a developer has to translate business requirements into coded tests. Many times some of what needs to be tested and how it needs to be tested gets lost in the translation. Wouldn't it be easier if the business person or QA person could just create the test cases themselves and still have them automated? FitNesse is a great testing framework that allows you to do just that. Using FitNesse, a developer creates test fixtures that allow non-technical people to write tests just by modifying a Wiki page. In this course I'll walk you through the steps to get set up and running with FitNesse. I'll show you how to use the older Fit style of creating test and the newer Slim style and we'll cover both Java and .NET, since FitNesse can work with either platform. FitNesse itself happens to be a Wiki, so it is also an excellent tool for documenting a system and the tests that go with it in a format that changes with the system. So if you've been thinking about learning about an acceptance test framework, or you've been wanted to learn FitNesse, but have always thought it had a steep learning curve, this course will help you to get started quickly and understand how FitNesse works.

About the author
About the author

John Sonmez is the founder of Simple Programmer (http://simpleprogrammer.com), where he tirelessly pursues his vision of transforming complex issues into simple solutions

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

FitNesse Overview
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight, and welcome to this course on creating acceptance tests with FitNesse. Perhaps you've heard of the testing tool FitNesse, but you never really understood what it's about. Or perhaps you've tried to use FitNesse, but found its different style of creating test and using Fixtures to make them run a bit difficult to grasp. Or maybe you've never even heard of FitNesse at all, but you're interested in creating acceptance tests. Whatever path brought you here, you'll find out what you need to know to be able to understand how FitNesse might fit into your testing and development strategy and how to get started creating tests. In this course, I'll show you how you can use FitNesse to easily create well-documented tests using a built in Wiki that comes with it and is actually part of the framework.

Creating Fit Fixtures
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight and in this module we'll be pumping some iron and getting fit. Well, not exactly, but we'll be covering Creating Fit Fixtures in FitNesse. I've found that Fit Fixtures can be a very confusing topic and there really isn't much information out there to help developers who want to learn about it. In this module, I'll break things down and show you how you can create Fit Fixtures that will work with FitNesse. We won't cover every single fixture in detail in this module, but I'll walk you through creating some of the most used types of fixtures as we create some simple tests to test a Protein tracking application. Now let's get started because "I'm going to pump you up".

Using The Slim Engine
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight, and in this module we'll be doing some exercises to help you slim down your waist line. Okay, maybe not, but at least I'll help you slim down some of your fixture code, as we learn about how to use the Slim Engine for creating fitness tests. This Slim Engine gives us a more synced way of writing our test and makes it a bit easier to create fixtures to make those tests work. Using Slim, we don't have to have fixture inherit from any specific base class, and we can have a more convention based approach. You'll also probably find that Slim support for scenarios, will make is easier to write the tests themselves, as scenarios give us a way to avoid repetitive test code. Once again, we won't have time to cover all of the fixtures or tables that you create and use with the Slim Engine. But we'll cover some of the most important ones.

Editing The Wiki
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight, and in this module we'll be learning a bit more about the FitNesse Wiki we've been using so far to create our tests. Although the primary purpose of FitNesse is to create and execute tests, it's also a powerful Wiki that can be used for a variety of purposes. In this module, I'll show what exactly a Wiki is and the ins and outs of the FitNesse Wiki. We've already seen the basics of adding and editing pages, but we'll look at all the other capabilities of the Wiki, and even learn how to create tests suites, that will run a collection of different tests.

FitNesse In .NET
Hi, this is John Sonmez from Pluralsight. And in this module we'll be learning how to take what we've learned about FitNesse and apply to a. NET project. If you've been watching the previous modules in this course, you probably have noticed, that everything we've done so far, has been on the Java side. But, we can take our same FitNesse Tests and FitNesse Wiki and run those tests against a. NET application, with minimal changes. Almost everything we've learned so far, applies in a very similar fashion to using FitNesse with. NET. In this module, I'll show you how to get fitSharp, the Fit in Slim Port for. NET running, and how to take the existing Fit and Slim Tests we have created and get them running against a. NET version of our ProteinTrackerService.