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Engineering Impact

How to weaponize impostor syndrome

Imposter syndrome can be a significant hindrance. Or, it can be a valuable tool in your arsenal. Software engineering manager Matt Elan explains how you can turn imposter syndrome into a source for good.

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Agile vs. being agile

“Welcome to Agile, where the stories are made up and the points don’t matter.” Learn how to shun arbitrary Agile-process-following in favor of actually becoming agile.

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Great leaders understand why small gestures matter

“Don’t let technology overwhelm your humanity” writes Bill Taylor, cofounder of Fast Company and the author of “Simply Brilliant: How Great Organizations Do Ordinary Things in Extraordinary Ways.” Read this uplifting post to understand how to lead with humanity.

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Tech workers are suffering from a silent epidemic of stress and physical burnout

Falling into the “hustle trap” hurts both individuals and their teams. This article from Jesse Weaver, Director of Entrepreneurial Design at CMCI Studio, makes a strong case for rethinking how we approach work and throwing out old ideas about “what works” in business.

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Questionable advice #2: How do I get my team into observability?

“How can I explain the importance of observability to developers who don’t always advocate for it?” asked one reader, echoing thoughts many of us have had before. In this advice column, Honeycomb co-founder Charity Majors busts some myths and gives no-nonsense advice for tackling the problem.

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Why human-centered design matters

What is human-centered design? How do you balance qualitative and quantitative data? What role should empathy have in product development? Pluralsight Head of Practices Mariah Hay discusses these challenges and more.

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