Accountability in 5 Steps

Accountability in the workplace doesn't just happen. It takes some skills and practice to get everyone to be accountable. Learn the skills that will help you to be accountable anywhere at any time.
Course info
Rating
(108)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 3, 2015
Duration
1h 55m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(108)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 3, 2015
Duration
1h 55m
Description

Learn five skills that can be mastered to bring accountability to your workplace, home, and personal relations. Not only will you become more accountable, but you will know how to hold others accountable without causing contention.

About the author
About the author

Ron is an experienced professional with in-depth expertise in corporate training, change management, communications, and facilitation.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Defining Accountability
Defining Accountability. My name is Ron Schindler, and let's go ahead and define some accountability. First of all we're going to start with one of my favorite peoples' quote, "I do the very best I know how - the very best I can; and I mean to keep on doing so until the end. " That's a great accountability quote. It also shows great empowerment, which we're going to talk about. So, as you can see, this is our first slide that has some icons at the top, a pause icon and a writing assignment. What I'd like you to do is look at this slide, and I want you to write down what does accountability mean to you. Take these different sections here. In your job or workplace, what does accountability mean? What do you look for? What do you define it as? For the vendors or contractors you may deal with, what does accountability mean for them? What does it mean for you when you deal with them? In your community how can you be accountable in a community? And in a relationship with your family what is accountability? So I'd like you to take a minute, pause this, and write those things down and then come on back.

Becoming Responsible
Thanks for being with me. Winston Churchill said, "The price of greatness is responsibility. " Do you want to be great? You need responsibility. So understanding how we can become responsible is what our objectives are on this module. When we first started this course I had you write down some thoughts about what you thought accountability was with your work, with vendors, with your family, and you might've noticed as we've talked about things that it has to do a little bit with an attitude or a mindset. If you look back at those notes you first made, how much are you changing? How is your attitude and your mindset about accountability now? There's always a level of ownership, a decision that has to be made about how much ownership should I take of this project or this task. That has a big reflection on how accountable we feel in the end. Understanding expectations is really important to us so that we know exactly what we're supposed to be doing, what kind of deliverable is supposed to be there in the end, and what success looks like. And we talked about commitment and buy-in. We're going to touch on that a little bit more. And the tool that's going to help us to get there is what's called an accountability contract, and we'll lay out the initial contract in this module, and then we'll continue in the next section to break it down on how to use that.

Committing to Being Accountable
Hello. I'm Ron Schindler, and we're going to talk about Committing to Being Accountable. We all like to say yes, and commit to being accountable. What do you know about what you're agreeing to? Most the time do you have all the facts that you need? We've talked about doing a contract and making sure that we have all the information so that we can commit properly. What do you know about your schedule? Can you commit to something right on the spot? Do you have to go back and look at your schedule, or are you pretty good at remembering exactly what you have coming up? How do you say no to things? I know it puts you in a political spot if you say no to your boss, but there's good ways to do that, and we're going to talk about that. We're going to do an exercise where we practice saying no. Now it's easy to do if you know all the components and how to do it. And then we're going to look at how do you renegotiate? We talked about renegotiation. It's an important part. It should be decided right at the beginning how we're going to renegotiate things if things turn a different direction. Remember, we talked about making sure that we do it right away, but we're going to talk about some other things in how to renegotiate.

Accountable Behavior
Hi. I'm Ron Schindler, and this module is on Accountable Behavior. Let's jump in here and see what accountable behavior is all about. When you look around at people that you know that seem to be very accountable, think about the qualities of that person. What kind of characteristics would you define them as having? These are the kinds of things we're going to be looking at in accountable behavior. The first thing I've always noticed is that these people that are successful with accountability do not have any excuses. Excuses only make us look like we didn't really want to be responsible for the item in the first place. We're going to talk about this in just a minute. Accountable behavior is somebody that can maneuver roadblocks and hurdles, things that come in front of them. Even though they've decided to make it to the end, there will always be something come up. And holding yourself accountable is accountable behavior. We're going to talk about what that means. Holding others accountable is also accountable behavior. We're going to talk about what that means to hold others accountable, as well as ourselves. All of these things will help us to look at ourselves as an accountable person, somebody that actually believes that we are accountable. As we work with others, we will be the ones displaying the accountable behavior. Let's break each of these down.

Learning and Correcting Our Accountability
Hello again. I'm Ron Schindler, and this module is about Learning and Correcting Our Accountability. Our objectives in this module include accepting outcomes. We'll find that it's very easy to accept good outcomes, but we're going to talk about accepting both good and bad outcomes. How we learn from issues is going to help us as we approach other tasks and other projects, and identifying learned information, how we can do that, how we can identify the things that we have learned. We're going to talk about how to continue learning and then how to reuse that learning that you've got in your toolbox. Finally, we're going to commit to doing things differently, and within this module we're also going to talk about a tool that we can actually continue to learn and correct our activities as we go forward. Here's a good Chinese proverb. "Learning is a treasure that will follow its owner everywhere, " so we should continue learning so that we can have a treasure we can take everywhere with us.