Administering Amazon Aurora on Amazon RDS

Amazon Aurora is a relational database that combines the power of commercial-grade performance with affordability and open-source. This course will help you master Aurora operations and understand why Aurora is the fastest growing service of AWS.
Course info
Rating
(15)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Dec 10, 2018
Duration
3h 25m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(15)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Dec 10, 2018
Duration
3h 25m
Description

AWS is reinventing the relational database landscape with their fast-growing engine, Amazon Aurora. In this course, Administering Amazon Aurora on Amazon RDS, you'll learn everything you'll need to migrate and operate Aurora clusters in AWS. First, you'll see the innovations Aurora is making and how to create an Aurora cluster. Next, you'll discover how to migrate existing databases to Aurora and how to manage, scale, and monitor those databases. Finally, you'll explore Aurora cloning, integration with other AWS services like Lambda, and bleeding edge technologies, Aurora Serverless and Aurora Multi-Master. After taking this course, you'll have gained the skills necessary to provide real-world value to organizations using Amazon Aurora.

About the author
About the author

Aaron is an independent cloud architect and software developer, specializing in solutions on Amazon Web Services (AWS). He holds several certifications encompassing development, architecture, and operations within the AWS cloud service suite. Aaron has contributed to companies offering services in the healthcare, training, and e-commerce sectors of business. His interests in the cloud space include automation, serverless computing, data, and security. When he isn't working on his next project, Aaron can be found gaming with friends, or at the local poker tables.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
(Music playing) Hey everyone, my name is Aaron Medacco, and welcome to my course Administering Amazon Aurora on Amazon RDS. I'm a software developer and cloud architect experienced in using Amazon Web Services, and I'm excited to teach you everything you need to know about AWS's relational database offering, Amazon Aurora. As the fastest-growing service in the Amazon Cloud, Amazon Aurora has combined the cost-effectiveness and ease of using open source database engine technologies with the scale, durability, availability, and performance of a commercial-grade solution. Whether you already use Aurora, or you've heard about it and are curious about what it is and how to migrate to it, this course has you covered. In this course, we'll walk through everything you need to know about Amazon Aurora to migrate, manage, scale, and monitor your Aurora clusters, as well as how to integrate it with other services in AWS. The major topics we'll cover include migrating existing databases over to an Aurora cluster, management, scaling, and monitoring Aurora clusters once they're operational, cloning and replication of your Aurora data for enterprise scale and development use cases, integration of Aurora with other AWS services, and some of the newest innovations of Aurora in Aurora Serverless and Aurora Multi-Master. By the end of this course, you'll have mastered the skills required to both migrate data to Aurora and use the tools it provides to upgrade your applications with the latest relational database technology. Before beginning this course, you should be comfortable with using Amazon Web Services at a basic level and familiar with SQL and relational databases in general. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn how to take advantage of AWS's fastest-growing service, Aurora, for your relational databases in the Administering Amazon Aurora on Amazon RDS course here at Pluralsight.

Introduction to Amazon Aurora
Hi there, and welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Aaron Medacco, and welcome to my course Administering Amazon Aurora on Amazon RDS. I'm a cloud architect and software developer, and I'm eager to show you how you can begin using Amazon's relational database offering, Aurora, to power your applications. Databases represent a significant and many times the most expensive component of an application's architecture. As an architect or as a developer working on an application requiring a data store, you need to think about items like cost, reliability, durability, and security. And since you're watching this course on Aurora, you're at least curious about the prospect of using Aurora for your application, which means you need to answer questions like, what is Aurora? Should I migrate to it? What does that entail? What are the benefits? And once I migrate, how do I manage Aurora? We'll answer all of these questions and more in this course, and by the time we're finished, you'll be fully capable of using Amazon Aurora for your applications in the real world. First, before we dive in, there's some items you'll want to have some experience with in order to receive the most out of this course. Since Amazon Aurora is an offering within the Amazon cloud, a general understanding of cloud computing and the more prevalent core services is preferable. These include IAM, S3, EC2, RDS, and VPC. Beyond that, some general experience using a relational database system is required. You don't need to be a certified AWS expert, or even an experienced database pro to take this course, but having some general knowledge and experience in both of these domains will help ensure concepts we cover don't intimidate or confuse. If you want to brush up on these skills before continuing, there are courses here on Pluralsight that cover these topics well. Namely, I would watch AWS Developer: Getting Started by Ryan Lewis to learn the basics of Amazon Web Services, and then watch Introduction to SQL by Jon Flanders if you don't have experience with relational databases.

Creating an Aurora Cluster
Until this point, we've only spoken about Aurora at a high level, and that's about to change. In this module, we'll demonstrate how to create an Aurora cluster for your application firsthand. This will be a brand-new Aurora cluster, so we aren't going to cover migration of an existing database until a little bit later on in the course. Okay, let's get started.

Migrating Data to an Aurora Cluster
Migration of data is probably the most popular topic when it comes to learning about Amazon Aurora. You've heard a lot of good things about Aurora up until this point, so the big question for many is how do we actually take advantage of Aurora for an existing application? In this module, we'll demonstrate what it takes to migrate an application from an existing database to an Aurora cluster. Let's get started.

Managing Our Aurora Cluster
Whether you started building a new application using Aurora from the beginning or whether you've migrated an existing application from another database engine, you now have to be up to the task of managing an Aurora cluster. While Aurora and, well, RDS, remove or reduce many of the manual and operational functions of traditional database management, we still need to be familiar with the options and tools available to us when using Aurora as our database engine. In this module, we're going to cover how to manage Aurora clusters. That means we're going to touch on scaling, monitoring, failure detection, failover, configuration, logging, and disaster recovery. That's a lot of items, but as developers DBAs or sysadmins, we need to be ready to handle the requirements, problems, growth, and change of the organizations we provide solutions for. And in learning that information now, we'll be prepared when the time comes. Let's get started.

Replication with Aurora
By now you're already aware of some of the replication techniques used by Amazon Aurora. We've talked about things like Aurora shared storage layer and horizontal scaling using read replicas throughout this course. Because replication is so fundamental to Aurora, we'll be reviewing some of those concepts, as well as introducing a few new replication techniques in this module. Let's get started.

Cloning Aurora Databases
As developers, we often run into circumstances where we need to copy or clone our databases. This happens for a number of reasons. Sometimes we have a client or manager that needs to crunch some numbers on the production data, or we want to test a new application feature we've been developing and see what it will look like with live data before rolling it out. Now, typically we could just take or use a backup of our live database, restore it to another machine, and then point the dev or test version of our application to it, or perform whatever work our manager wants us to on the copy so we don't affect the production database negatively. In this module, we'll look at a feature of Aurora cloning that will help us in these kinds of scenarios. Let's dive in.

Aurora Integration with Other AWS Services
Amazon Aurora as an offering of RDS exists within the ecosystem of AWS. As is the case with many other services in the Amazon cloud, AWS provides methods for customers to connect Aurora to other services where there is value. In this module, we'll look at those integrations between services so you know what else is available if you want to or are already using AWS for more than just your relational databases.

Aurora Serverless and Aurora Multi-Master
Predictable. Aurora Serverless can provide some value in those cases when it comes to cost and scalability. And what about write performance? We understand an Aurora cluster maintains a primary instance responsible for writing data to the shared storage volume used by the cluster. But how is Amazon innovating to allow customers to scale write performance horizontally? This is where Aurora Multi-Master comes in, and in addition to helping improve write scalability, it can also improve the availability of the cluster when a primary instance fails over. Let's dive in.