Advanced Color Grading in Adobe SpeedGrade CC and Premiere Pro CC

Color grading fuels emotion into your visual productions. This course is designed to build on to your Adobe Premiere Pro CC knowledge by furthering your color grading capabilities inside of SpeedGrade CC. Software required: Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2015 or later, Adobe SpeedGrade CC 2015 or later.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jul 13, 2016
Duration
3h 6m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Introduction
Direct Linking to SpeedGrade CC
Color Grading with Primary Layer Stacks in SpeedGrade
Effective Secondary Layer Grading
Auto Shot Match and Applying Look Layers in SpeedGrade CC
Optimal Render Settings and Name Automation in SpeedGrade CC
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jul 13, 2016
Duration
3h 6m
Description

Have you ever wondered how to inject more emotion into your video productions as an editor? If so, Advanced Color Grading in Adobe SpeedGrade CC and Premiere Pro CC is the perfect course for you. In this advanced course you will go beyond the fundamentals of video editing by learning how to isolate color into primary and secondary layers for pixel-perfect tone correction. This will allow you to create powerfully effective imagery that cannot be done inside of Premiere Pro alone. First, you will learn how to properly analyze, monitor, and easily manipulate color inside of your Premiere Pro video edits to successfully produce broadcast friendly content that can be aired on television. Next, you will leverage the power of LUT (look up table) files inside of Premiere Pro CC (2015) and carry that information over to Adobe SpeedGrade by using the power of Adobe's Direct Link inside of the Creative Cloud platform. This will allow you to perform complex color corrections in seconds. Finally, you will understand how to process R3D (REDCAM) and RAW video footage inside of SpeedGrade by using EDL files, IRCP files, and Direct Link from Premiere Pro for optimal pixel perfect color flexibility. When you're finished with this color correction and grading course, you'll not only know how to create the popular "Pleasantville effect" with objects in your video content, but also how to manipulate the color of moving objects by performing auto-tracking with masks around your subjects. Software required: Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2015 or later, Adobe SpeedGrade CC 2015 or later.

About the author
About the author

Acosta is best known as a digital media consultant and mentor for some of the largest Fortune 500 companies. He is also co-founder and product manager of Woowave DreamSync, a software designed to synchronize audio and video without the need for timecode.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Jonathan Acosta and welcome to my course Advanced Color Grading in Adobe SpeedGrade CC and Premiere Pro CC. I'm the executive producer over at Pixel Links Labs. You may not be aware of this, but color grading is the hidden art that fuels emotion into your visual productions. In this course you're going to build onto your editing skills by training on how to take a complex edit inside of Premiere Pro CC and direct link it into SpeedGrade so that you can enrich the look and the feel of your footage. Some of the major topics that we will cover include the optimal color balancing workflow inside of Premiere Pro, direct linking your project from Premiere Pro to SpeedGrade CC 2015, effective color multitasking using masks and secondary isolations, how to automatically color sync similar video footage, and now to auto track your clips while enhancing a moving subject. By the end of this course, you'll understand how to fully navigate and leverage the SpeedGrade interface to pull off emotional color manipulation with a purpose. Please keep in mind that before you begin this course you should be familiar with Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2015. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn how to enhance your editing skills with the advanced color grading in Adobe SpeedGrade CC and Premiere Pro CC course, right here at Pluralsight.

Introduction
Hi this is Jon Acosta and welcome to Advanced Color Grading in Adobe SpeedGrade CC and Premiere Pro CC. As you probably already know, color correction is an important finishing step in almost all video and film work. And if you're watching this course, chances are you're already familiar with color correction plugins inside of editing programs like Adobe Premiere Pro CC. So throughout this course we are going to take a step further into the beautifully created world of color grading by learning advanced workflow strategies to get our footage from Adobe Premiere Pro into Adobe SpeedGrade CC. Doing this will allow us to take advantage of all the professional tools and color grading manipulation that a video colorist truly needs to get the job done. So if you're a video editor looking to expand your color grading capabilities to really wow your audience and clients, this course is absolutely for you. And before we do that, we're going to take a minute to reestablish the differences between color grading and color correction. Throughout our course we'll be performing color grades and color corrections interchangeably, and I know it sounds simple, but you'd be surprised how many editors don't actually know the difference between these two methodologies. We're going to evaluate these terms very quickly, so let's hop into our demo and check it out.

Effective Secondary Layer Grading
So far we've gone over Adobe Premiere Pro's Direct Link into SpeedGrade, we've gone over the initial SpeedGrade interface, and we've even gone over grading using primary layers inside of SpeedGrade. And now we're going to explore secondary layers, which are basically like primary layers but even more fun. So first of all, what is a secondary layer? Well, you can think of a secondary layer as an isolation layer that allows us to really manipulate a particular aspect of a shot to the exact hue or the exact tonality and color. So just like primaries where we're fixing things inside of our shots, the secondary layers allow us to get into those fixes we've created and modify just specific aspects and further manipulate their density or their contrast to create a really unique picture. So to really drill down what I mean, we're going to jump into a shot from our client and this particular shot is going to require us to isolate the green mountains in the background to add a bit more saturation to them, and really make them stand out, all the while not effecting the lake in front of it or the man in front of the lake.