Android for .NET Developers: 3 Adopting The Android Mindset

This course teaches you how to think like an Android developer. It moves you beyond simply leveraging your existing skills to creating Android apps that take advantage of the Android platform’s unique capabilities to meet and exceed user expectations.
Course info
Rating
(209)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Aug 14, 2013
Duration
3h 27m
Table of contents
Working With Fragments
Dynamically Adapting to Device Differences
Moving From Menu Thinking to Action Thinking
Understanding The Navigation Drawer
Using Activities Across Apps
Description
Course info
Rating
(209)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Aug 14, 2013
Duration
3h 27m
Description

Creating high-quality, successful Android apps requires much more than just learning a list of features, you must learn to think like an Android developer. This course teaches you how to do exactly that. It moves you beyond simply leveraging your existing skills to creating user-oriented Android apps that take advantage of the Android platform’s unique capabilities. The specific behaviors and usage patterns of mobile users are discussed with a focus on the Android classes and features that facilitate the building of rich, user-oriented Android apps that meet and exceed user expectations.

About the author
About the author

Jim Wilson is president of JW Hedgehog, Inc., a consulting firm specializing in solutions for the Android, iOS, and Microsoft platforms. Jim has over 30 years of software engineering experience, with the past 15 years heavily focused on creating mobile device and location-based solutions.

More from the author
More courses by Jim Wilson
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Working With Fragments
Welcome to the Working with Fragments module of the Adopting the Android Mindset course in Pluralsight's Android for. NET for Developers Series. My name is Jim Wilson. We'll start out just briefly looking at the prerequisites and expectations for this course. Then we'll dig into the question of What are fragments and why do we care about them? We'll then look at fragment availability across different Android platforms and how we have to work with them differently depending on a given platform's level of support. We'll look at actually creating the fragments. How do we code them up? How do we tie UI to them? How do we put them on an activity? We'll then get into the activity/fragment relationship--how do we coordinate activity and actions across those? We'll look at a demo that actually goes into detail of how we coordinate all that activity and fragment content. And then we'll finish up with a demo on swipe navigation showing how we implement the capability of the use, kind of left to right or right to left swiping to move through the pages of an application.

Dynamically Adapting to Device Differences
Welcome to the Dynamically Adapting to Device Differences module of the Adopting the Android Mindset course for Pluralsight's Android for. NET Developers Series. My name is Jim Wilson. The first thing we're going to look at is the need for application adaptability, why it's important to behave differently on different devices. The features that Android provides that make adaptability easier to implement. The issue of density independence. How do we size things in a consistent way when there are so many different device resolutions out there? Android's resource system and how it has adaptability built into it and how we manage that. Specific issue of differences in device display sizes. These affect experience tremendously. How do we make the best of each scenario that we deploy into? And then, finally, the issue of resource aliasing. If we have the same resource files that apply to different scenarios, how do we avoid the maintenance problem of duplicating them over and over again?

Moving From Menu Thinking to Action Thinking
Welcome to the Moving from Menu Thinking to Action Thinking module of the Adopting the Android Mindset course from Pluralsight's Android For. NET Developers Series. My name is Jim Wilson. As we go through this module, there are several key things we're going to talk about. The first one is moving from menu to ActionBar. Menus are something we're very used to using, especially in desktop applications. And menus, of course, provide kind of a key way to get to features inside of your application. But we find that on devices, they're not necessarily the ideal way. So, we want to think about how do we change our thinking to be more mobile friendly using the ActionBar? So, we'll talk about activity and fragment ActionBar cooperation. Since we now build our user interface as a combination of activities and fragments, both of these get to participate in the ActionBar, putting things there and handling them. We need to understand how the two work together and how to keep them from getting in each other's way. Then we'll talk about linking to the app home screen. Very often, applications may have a lot of screens to them, but one particular screen is the home screen. It's kind of the initial place the user wants to interact with or a key place the user wants to interact with. The Android ActionBar gives us an easy way so that users can reset home screen in a single click. As we build our applications, we want to allow users to get to as many features as possible in a single click but without cluttering up our user interface, so we'll talk about how we make more of these actions directly accessible. And we'll finish up with learning more about the ActionBar. What are some of the other features that are out there and how we learn more about using them.

Understanding The Navigation Drawer
Welcome to the Understanding the Navigation Drawer module of the Adopting the Android Mindset course from Pluralsight's Android for. NET Developers series. My name is Jim Wilson. In this module, the first thing we're going to do is introduce the navigation drawer, just get a sense of what it is and why it exists. Then we'll look at how we create a very simple navigation drawer. We'll then expand on that and look at how navigation drawers are commonly used and how we provide options to the user on a navigation drawer. We'll then look at how we tie the navigation drawer into the ActionBar to create a more sophisticated experience for the user. And then, finally, when we're dealing with multi-activity applications, how do we create a consistent user experience using our navigation drawer?

Using Activities Across Apps
Welcome to the Using Activities Across Apps module of the Adopting the Android Mindset course from Pluralsight's Android for. NET Developers series. My name is Jim Wilson. In this module, the first thing we're going to look at is Android's task-oriented approach moving away from a concept of putting everything in a single application and, instead, looking at user tasks and how we can pull features together to achieve that task. We'll look briefly at using explicit intents, something we've seen before in this course, but we'll just kind of review exactly the way it works. We're then going to focus on using implicit intents, the really kind of heart and soul of how Android achieves much of what it does. And then, finally, how do we build on this concept of implicit intents to create our own application to contain activities that can be laced together as part of other tasks, not only for our own application needs but also to be able to cooperate with other things that might be going on in the same device.