Animate CC Lip Syncing

Adobe Animate CC is your all-in-one animation suite. Learn how to build a mouth, create phonemes, and animate a body to create a dynamic lip syncing sequence for any character.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 13, 2017
Duration
4h 17m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Getting Started with Lip Syncing
Constructing the Mouth
Creating Mouth Poses
Animating the Mouth and Body
Animating the Head
Animating Eye Blinks
Enhancing Motion and Audio
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 13, 2017
Duration
4h 17m
Description

Animate CC is your all-in-one animation suite. Now, with the new Frame Picker, lip syncing your characters is easier than ever! In this course, Animate CC Lip Syncing, you will build a mouth with a series of layers, create eight poses, and lip sync to a voice with the Frame Picker. Then, you will go further by animating the body to the voice, adding a head turn, creating blinks, and adding squash and stretch. Along the way, you will learn the importance of anticipation, follow-through and the proper way to handle multi-symbol documents. By the end of this course, you'll understand how to create animation with lip syncing. Software Required: Adobe Animate CC.

About the author
About the author

Chad Troftgruben is a freelance animator and screencaster who specializes in Animate CC, Moho, After Effects and Premiere. He has been working with Flash since 2002 which resulted in the creation of several cartoons for both entertainment and commercial purposes.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
My name is Chad Troftgruben, and you're watching Animate CC Lip Syncing. In this course, you will learn the process of lip syncing a character to a voice. This is a great course if you're new to animation or Animate CC in general. We'll begin the process by looking at our files and charts that come along with the course, and setting up our workspace. Then we'll move onto constructing the mouth. This involves creating a mouth symbol, drawing the inner mouth, teeth, tongue, and masking the mouth to ensure everything is contained within the inner mouth. Then it's onto creating the mouth poses themselves. We'll label everything out so we have a plan of attack, and then we'll go through and shape eight different mouth poses that we can use to help compliment sounds within the voice file. Once your mouth poses are complete, we can move over to setting up the animation from the mouth, and we'll do this by using the Frame Picker. From there we'll move to the body, label everything out so we have a plan, and then create poses for anticipation, settling, a head turn, dips, and more. Once all the poses are keyed, we can tween and polish up the animation. Then we will animate out the head, this will complement the body. It'll follow a similar process as well, such as, keying and tweening. Then, once everything is in place, we can animated out the eyes. The eyes anticipate, as well as create direction for the animation. We'll also animate eyelashes, we will create multiple blinks, we'll animate out a pupil, and we'll ensure that both eyes match when the animation is complete. And in the final module, we'll add a little bit of squash and stretch to our character, as well as export out the animation and clean up the audio to ensure it's ready for distribution. By the time you're done with this course, you should not only have a strong understanding of lip syncing, but you'll also get a crash course in character animation as well. So I hope you're ready, because we're about to get started.

Getting Started with Lip Syncing
Before we dive in and start animating and doing all these exciting things inside of Animate CC, I think it's best to take a moment and talk about some of the files that have come with this course that will help you with animating out a lip-syncing sequence. This module will be short and concise, that way you can get up and running with the process. But hopefully this starting module will act as a guide to help you along with the process. So more specifically in this module, we'll talk about the charts that come with this course. These can be very useful, especially when it comes to designing the mouth poses or trying to figure out how to animate the character after the mouth is in place. We'll talk about the importance of customizing workspaces. It's important to make sure that your workspace accommodates the work at hand. Certain workspaces work better for animation and design, and we'll talk a little bit about that, and even set up some workspaces that we can use throughout the course. And then we'll touch on the character file we plan to use in this course. This includes examining the symbols, the hierarchy, and talking a little bit about what we plan to do with the mouth.

Constructing the Mouth
In this module, we'll officially begin work by designing the mouth for the character. This will allow us then to create poses for the mouth, which we can pick using the Frame Picker once it's time to lip sync with an audio file. More specifically in this module, we'll talk about constructing the lips for the character. The lips are really the first thing we'll see with this character, so it's important that we construct them so they look nice, and fit with the rest of the character and mouth design. We'll talk about creating a mouth opening, that way when it comes time to create poses we can show the inside of the mouth. We'll talk about drawing the teeth and tongue, once again allowing us to create mouth poses, and we'll talk about masking the mouth, so that way all of the stuff that we're making can fit nicely into a mask so there's no overlap and the design looks seamless. So with all that said, we're going to jump in and get started constructing the mouth.

Creating Mouth Poses
With our mouth now constructed, we can dive in and start creating the mouth poses that we will invoke later on when syncing up the mouth to a voice. This process isn't really all that hard, it's mostly tedious and involves moving points, unlocking and locking layers, revealing layers, duplicating frames, and molding the mouth from your existing construction to fit the shape for the sound that you want your character to make. More specifically, in this module, we'll set ourselves up for an easy workflow. We'll start by labeling mouth poses. That way we know where each mouth pose should lie within the timeline. We'll talk about duplicating frames for references. We'll be doing this a lot. We'll be borrowing the mouth opening from other poses as well as duplicating the inner mouth for the mask on each frame. And we'll also mold eight mouth poses throughout this module. You can do more than eight, but eight should be enough for a simple lip-syncing sequence.

Animating the Mouth and Body
With our mouth poses in place, we can move on to officially animating out the mouth using the Frame Picker and then applying body poses that help compliment the dialog for our character. More specifically in this module we will import audio into Animate CC. And we'll talk about how you should set up this audio file, why you should use stream versus event, and more. We'll also lip sync with the Frame Picker. The Frame Picker allows us to move in between frames within a symbol visually with thumbnails. I think you'll find that lip syncing is quick and easy with this new feature. Then we'll set up the body poses, again using the audio file as a reference and creating labels. Then with those body poses we'll animate using a classic tween, and then we'll do some cleanup to make sure that the animation is as smooth as possible.

Animating the Head
With the mouth and body now set, we can move onto animating the head. We'll be using the same labels and poses from the previous module. This should be easier compared to animating the body because we only have one symbol to worry about. More specifically, in this module, first, we will prepare the head for animation, which involves getting the labels ready so we have a path moving forward. And we can also import our audio file to help with referencing as well. We'll talk about inserting the head poses, and we'll also rotate and move the head into position, including the head turn to ensure everything is going to work when it comes time to tween. And then, once we tween, we'll polish the animation by duplicating frames and making sure that the start frames are correct when it comes time to sync.

Animating Eye Blinks
With the mouth, body, and head now set up and animated, the final piece of the puzzle is to add blinks with the eyes. By adding blinks, we can anticipate major movements, such as the head turn, and also add more life to the character. We can also use this as a way to mask other movements, such as moving the pupils to interact with the audience. So while it's a small feature in the whole overall animation, blinking can really help add emphasis to certain actions and smooth out the entire process. So in this module, more specifically, we're going to dive in to shape tweening the eyelids and eyelashes. Shape tweening is great for moving loose vectors, and both the eyelids and lashes are these types of objects. So once we accomplish that, we'll move on to adding more blinks, which we can do by duplicating frames and putting them wherever we need on the timeline. And then we'll talk about swapping symbols, and in our case, why it's useful to duplicate the second eye once we finish with the first.

Enhancing Motion and Audio
In this final module, we're going to quickly go through, enhance the motion of the character by adding some squash and stretch, and then we'll clean up the audio file once it's exported outside of Animate CC. More specifically, in this module, we're going to talk about adding bounce to the character, which we'll do using our Free Transform tool. We'll talk about exporting our animations out through Animate CC, and what you should pay attention to when doing so. And we'll also talk about cleaning up the audio; this can be done through Premiere or other video editing software, and all it requires is you have the original audio file you used when lip syncing.