Installing and Configuring Apache Web Server

In this course we will install and configure an Apache web server from scratch on a linux system.
Course info
Rating
(282)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Sep 23, 2013
Duration
2h 19m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(282)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Sep 23, 2013
Duration
2h 19m
Description

In this course we will install and configure an Apache web server from scratch on a linux system. We will learn about Apache's configuration file and how to configure multiple virtual sites on a single machine. We'll configure user logins and access controls to restrict access to parts of the site, and set up apache to serve a secure http connection using the secure sockets layer and a self-signed certificate. Finally, we'll see how to configure the logging and status reporting features of Apache. The course is intended for web administrators with no previous experience of Apache. Basic linux command-line competence is assumed. Students may follow along with all demos by installing a standard CentOS 6 distribution.

About the author
About the author

Dr. Chris Brown has been using UNIX as a software developer and system administrator since its pioneering days over 30 years ago, and has used Linux professionally and at home for about 10 years.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Creating Secure Connections with SSL
Welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Creating Secure Connections with SSL, and I'm Dr. Chris Brown. Now, I must apologize up front because in this lesson we're going to do some theory. I promise you there won't be any actual Maths. I personally have a very limited understanding of the Maths that lies behind this chapter and you don't need to understand it either. But our objectives in this video are first to learn the basics of symmetric and asymmetric encryption. Then we'll come to understand hashes, digital signatures, digital certificates, and the secure sockets layer, and we'll use those technologies to configure Apache with the secure sockets layer to serve a secure site; that is one that uses the HTTPS protocol. The end result is that the browser is able to verify the identity of the site it's browsing to and is able to set up an encrypted channel between the browser and the server. Now hopefully I don't need to work too hard to convince you of the need for secure connections. They're essential whenever sensitive information is being traded between a user and a web server. In our case, our library is storing members' personal information and requires a secure connection for them to enter and retrieve that information.

Apache Logging and Status Reporting
Welcome to Pluralsight. You're watching Apache Logging and Status Reporting, and I'm Dr. Chris Brown. In this lesson, we'll see how to configure Apache to write access logs. These logs will tell you what pages have been served and when and who to. We'll also see that Apache writes error logs too, though it reports the things that are going wrong. And finally, we'll look at a couple of features that let you capture an instantaneous snapshot of server activity and some information about how it was built. Our branch libraries can mind the information in these log files with simple log file analysis tools to answer questions about how busy their site is, who's been using it, and maybe even which book categories are the most popular. And examining the error logs may help them identify operational errors in the site.