Azure Hybrid Connections: First Look

An introduction to Microsoft Azure Hybrid Connections, a preview feature that lets you easily connect Azure Websites and Mobile Services to on-premises resources without any code or network changes.
Course info
Rating
(64)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jun 13, 2015
Duration
1h 48m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(64)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jun 13, 2015
Duration
1h 48m
Description

This course introduces Microsoft Azure Hybrid Connections, a new preview feature of BizTalk Services which allows you to easily and securely connect your Azure Websites and Mobile Services to on-premises resources without any changes to your corporate network. Best of all, it is purely a configuration-driven experience that requires no additional code – allowing you to "lift & shift" your existing on-premises website or mobile service straight to the cloud. This feature is currently in Public Preview only, so there may be some differences between the presentations here and your actual experience as Microsoft evolves this product.

About the author
About the author

Dan is a Microsoft MVP (Azure), a Microsoft Certified Solution Expert (MSCE), a Microsoft Certified Technical Specialist (MCTS) in BizTalk Server 2010, and a Microsoft Certified Trainer (MCT). An enterprise integration specialist, Dan is a frequent blogger and speaker and leads the Brisbane Azure User Group.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Getting Started
Hi. I'm Dan Toomey. In this module I'm going to show you how to get started using Azure Hybrid Connections so you can begin building hybrid applications that span between the Cloud and your on-premises line of business systems. The first step is to provision an instance of Microsoft Azure BizTalk Services or MABS as we call it for short. Currently, Hybrid Connections live inside of MABS. If you have already provisioned MABS, then you simply add Hybrid Connections to that instance, but if you don't have a need for any of the other application integration features of MABS such as EAI or EDI Bridges, then you can create a free preview edition of MABS that can only host Hybrid Connections. Once we have a MABS instance we then simply create the hybrid connection defined by the server name and port number of the on-premises resource we want to connect to. Finally, we need to install the Hybrid Connection Manager somewhere within our corporate network so we can establish the necessary link between the Cloud and your on-prem resources. Before we create the hybrid connection, we need to know what the line of business application or resource is that we want to connect to. This is because the connection is defined by the server name and TCP port number. In this case, we are creating a connection to a SQL Server database that lives on the server DEVDAN05. Because this database is on the default instance, the port number is 1433.

Connecting Azure Mobile Services to On-premises Resources
Hi. I'm Dan Toomey. In this module I'm going to show you how to use a Hybrid Connection to access an on-premises from an Azure mobile service. By default, mobile services are created to expose data that is hosted in the Cloud, but what if your application requires access to enterprise systems or databases that cannot be lifted up into Azure? Hybrid Connections not only makes that possible, but easy as well. We'll begin by reviewing the sample mobile service that Microsoft provides when you first create one in Azure. This service is a simple to-do list application where the data is hosted in Azure. We'll then modify this application to point to an on-premises database rather than a default database. Finally, we'll link up an existing Hybrid Connection to this service, which will make that connectivity to the database possible and prove that the app still works as designed. As mentioned before, the sample demo is a little to-do application designed for a Windows phone that lets you create and manage items in the list. We won't be getting into the specifics of how the application works or how it's rendered on the device. We'll just concentrate on how we can change the source of the data and use the client test interface to prove that the updated connection is working. However, if you're interested in learning more about Azure Mobile Services, then I'd highly recommend checking out this excellent course by Matt Milner entitled Windows Azure Mobile Services.

Managing Hybrid Connections
Hi. I'm Dan Toomey. In this module we're going to discuss how you manage Hybrid Connections once they're created. This section will appeal primarily to dev-ops personnel who are responsible for the administration and security of Hybrid Connections as opposed to the developers who design and build the applications. The first part of this module will focus on the security aspects of Hybrid Connections, discussing how the data is secured in transit between the Cloud and the corporate network using transport layer security, as well as how the endpoints both in the Cloud and on-premises are secured independently with shared access signatures. We'll also mention how group policy can be used to enforce constraints within the local network. Next, we'll talk about the cardinality features including how multiple app instances and multiple connection managers can be used with a single Hybrid Connection to enable load balancing and ensure resiliency. Finally, we'll have a brief look at the PowerShell and REST APIs that allow you to manage your Hybrid Connections from the command line or a REST client.

Course Summary
Hi. I'm Dan Toomey and in this module I'm going to wrap up this course in Microsoft Azure Hybrid Connections by reviewing the basic concepts that we've covered throughout the preceding modules. Specifically, we'll cover the five W's. Number one, why we should build hybrid applications in the first place and what problems they solve. Two, when it's appropriate to use Hybrid Connections for achieving integration between the Cloud and on-premises systems. Three, who will have access to resources that are connected by this technology. In other words, what security mechanisms are put in place. Four, how enterprise administrators can maintain control of their resources and manage Hybrid Connections once they are put in place. And finally, five, a look at what might be around the corner, considering that Hybrid Connections is still a preview offering in Azure. Well, okay. It's actually four W's and an H, but at least how ends in W.