Microsoft Azure Service Bus

The Windows Azure Service Bus provides the messaging backbone for applications that live in the cloud, in your data center, and across desktops, laptops, and mobile devices.
Course info
Rating
(221)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 9, 2012
Duration
2h 5m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(221)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 9, 2012
Duration
2h 5m
Description

The Windows Azure Service Bus provides the messaging backbone for applications that live in the cloud, in your data center, and across desktops, laptops, and mobile devices. The relay service provides a mechanism to traverse firewalls. Queues provide a smart, secure way to exchange messages between disconnected devices. Topics and subscriptions allow for intelligent message distribution across applications.

About the author
About the author

Scott Seely is the president of The Jeanius Factory, Inc., a Microsoft Regional Director and a Microsoft MVP.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Windows Azure Service Bus Basics
Hi, my name is Scott Seely and I'm with Pluralsight. In this module we're going to talk about the Windows Azure Service Bus Basics. We'll start by discussing what exactly is the Service Bus. We'll then look at the various services that the Service Bus provides, that is the relay service, pub/sub, and queues. We'll then look at some of the basic interactions that one does when working with the Service Bus. By the time we're done you're going to have enough basic information to understand what is common between these various aspects of the Windows Azure Service Bus.

Windows Azure Service Bus Relay Service
Hi, my name is Scott Seely and I'm with Pluralsight. In this module, we're going to cover the Azure Service Bus relay service. We're going to start the module out by looking at the relay service and giving you an idea of how the relay service functions, what it does, what message exchange patterns it supports and so on. At the end of the day though, it's really important to understand that the relay service itself is a thing that supports WCF programmers pretty well. Now it is a general-purpose service that has a REST based interface, that allows you to put messages on the service and then retrieve than later, but layered on top of that is a bunch of stuff that works really well with Windows Communication Foundation. So we're going to spend the majority of this module deep in code, looking at how we integrate our applications with the relay service itself.

Windows Azure Service Bus Queues and Topics
Hi I'm Scott Seely and I'm with Pluralsight. In this module we're going to talk about the Windows Azure Service Bus Queues and Topics. One of the most exciting features to the messaging platform on Windows Azure is the Service Bus Queues and Topics feature. Queues and topics allow you to get the building blocks for building scalable, reliable applications. We'll dig into how these are implemented, the common types, and how you think about queues and topics in this module. Another interesting thing about the queues and topics information is that you also need the ability to handle messages when they can't be accessed or when they've timed out and no one wants to access them anymore. So there's two different types of messages that you have to worry about, the ones that have timed out and are no longer accessible are called dead letters. They're no longer available, they're just a message that for some reason wasn't processed. There's another type of message out there called a poison message and a poison message is one that during the course of being processed causes the process to do something bad and not complete processing the message. So we'll take a look at how you handle both message types in this module. We'll then move on and take a look at some of the advanced features that are available inside Service Bus Queues and Topics. In particular we'll be looking at using sessions, so I can do request response pairs over queues. We'll also look at using transactions, so I can make sure that a block of messages arrives or doesn't arrive to the queue as a single unit. And finally, we'll close us by taking a look at WCF integration. Because queues and topics replaces some of the bindings that we had from the earlier versions of the Service Bus, in particular the net one-way binding and the net one-way event relay binding. We'll look at how you use this new binding, the net message binding, to do the same types of things on a much heavier, broader scale.