Beginner's Guide to Rigging in Maya

In this collection of Maya rigging tutorials, we will learn the foundations for rigging in Maya. Software required: Maya 2011 and up.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Mar 1, 2011
Duration
49m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Mar 1, 2011
Duration
49m
Description

In this collection of Maya rigging tutorials, we will learn the foundations for rigging in Maya. We will start off by covering the most basic form of rigging - parenting. We will then take a look at how to modify the pivot of an object and how to work with groups. After that, you will learn about joints, inverse kinematics, and control objects. And to wrap up this project, we will go over the Maya binding process for skin deformations. By the end of the training, you will understand essential terms and definitions and build a solid foundation for rigging in Maya. Software required: Maya 2011 and up.

About the author
About the author

Delano works avidly as an animation author at Pluralsight. Starting his career at animation studios like Shilo, Delano has developed a strong passion for his talents. His animation and rigging background help him teach and create some of the most-watched training on Pluralsight.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
Introducing the Beginner's Guide to Rigging in Maya, a fundamental learning series brought to you by Digital-Tutors, the world's largest online CG training library. My name is Delano, and I'll be giving you an introductory look into rigging in Maya, so you can learn essential terms and definitions and build a solid foundation in computer graphics. We'll start by covering the most basic form of rigging, which is parenting. We'll then take a look at how to modify an object, pivot, and how to work with groups. After that, you'll learn about joints, inverse kinematics, and control objects. And to wrap up this project, we'll go over Maya's bonding process for skin deformations. This series of step-by-step videos were developed with artists new to Maya in mind. So we'll be moving at a steady, easy-to-follow pace making sure you understand the terms and basic techniques. To view more beginners' guided courses, visit our library where you'll find the largest collection of free high-quality CG training videos. So let's go ahead and get started with our next lesson where we'll learn what rigging is and why it's so essentially in production.

Beginner's Guide to Rigging in Maya
In this lesson, we'll understand what rigging is and why it's needed in production. This scene is Rigging Basics 02 Begin, in your project files. So what is rigging? Well, it all boils down to building controls to manipulate objects and models in our scene. Now, why would we need rigging? Well, a lot of times after a modeler has built a character-- what we see before us-- we then want to have that character move around. We want to put a skeleton inside that character and then creates controls to drive that skeleton, which will, in turn, move our character. So without rigging, we wouldn't be able to do that. Now there are several types of levels of complexity, when it comes to rigging. We have the more advanced type of rigging. And that type of rigging is what we'd use for character animation. So if we were to hit Play in our scene. I'll just go to the Play controls and hit the Play button. You'll see, we have our character moving around, in a way where were we get an idea that this character is now living, has some type of personality. Now rigging can also be as basic as what we see here, with the cube that's been squashed. Yes, that has been rigged as well, so we can have squash and stretch deformations. So now that we understand what rigging is and why rigging is so essential in production, we're going to go ahead and stop the lesson here. In the next lesson, we'll take a look at the most basic form of rigging, which is called parenting.