Preparing Reality Capture Data for BIM

This course will help you to master the major data formats for reality capture being used today for surveying above ground, and also master the ways of preparing these for use in BIM environments like Revit. Software required: Autodesk Recap 360.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 14, 2016
Duration
53m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 14, 2016
Duration
53m
Description

Reality capture data digitally connects engineers with the building site before the project even starts. The context it provides is crucial for everyone involved, from architects to facility managers. This course, Preparing Reality Capture Data for BIM, will help you to understand and use the different kinds of data formats used for reality capture today. First, you'll learn how laser scanning and photogrammetry work. Next, you'll learn about automatic and manual 3D reconstruction of images. Finally, you'll cover how to prepare 3D laser scanner point cloud data for 3D modeling software. At the end of this course, you'll understand what reality capture data formats to use and when, and you'll be able to prepare them for BIM environments. Software required: Autodesk Recap 360.

About the author
About the author

Dejan is an architect and BIM enthusiast dedicated to making project development in architecture open for the digital age, understandable for all the involved parties, and most importantly communication friendly for teams scattered across the globe.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Dejan, and welcome to my course on Preparing Reality Capture Data for BIM, or Building Information Modeling. I'm an architect and a BIM enthusiast. This course will show you how things around us get measured these days, especially in the building industry, and not just any other old-fashioned way, but in 3D with old tools like digital cameras and with new ones like 3D laser scanners. By the end of this course, you'll know how to make digital replicas of things around you from small ones like your mobile phones, to huge ones like city blocks. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with basic concepts that apply to any of the 3D modeling tools popular today. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn Preparing Reality Capture Data for BIM, or Building Information Modeling, here at Pluralsight.

General Overview
Hi, and welcome to Preparing Reality Capture Data for BIM, or Building Information Modeling. My name is Dejan, and I'm an architect and BIM enthusiast. I'm really excited to share with you the evolution of how geometric data is measured around the world, especially in the fields of civil and architectural engineering, as well as surveying, so let's get started.

Photogrammetry
Photogrammetry. So this is the reality capture method which has to do with light and measuring, right? Mind the pho and the metry word parts. But in a broader sense, you could also call 3D laser scanning a photogrammetry method, since in that case we measure distances using photos shot from a laser source to the target and back. And both of these methods actually fall into the same optical remote sensing measurement group, because we are measuring something without touching the object. I just wanted to bring your attention to how much methods for reality capture, and especially those involving measurement with light, have in common. For starters, let's just assume that we know that by taking several digital photographs of an object we can eventually end up with some kind of measurement data on the object by analyzing those images. It's crucial to also know that we do need several photographs taken, and not just one, because remember, a single image still contains just 2D data. On that note, what we really can focus on when using photogrammetry are two kinds of data extractions, and those are metrical, like this trash can is 10 inches tall. These are widely used in surveying applications to determine distances, elevations, outlines for compiling topographical maps, and many other uses. Usually you acquire them using drones, but also using terrestrial imaging, or simply put, taking photos from ground level. And, of course, interpretative, like hey, that's a trash can. These methods' end goal is recognizing objects from photographic images, meaning figuring out if the image contains a box, or a dog, or something else, purely by using computation power and artificial intelligence. I have to say I won't be covering this subject in this course.

3D Laser Scanning
So let's get into more detail on 3D laser scanning, or as people in the business like to call it, high definition surveying, or HDS. As I've mentioned before, 3D laser scanning is just another type of remote sensing reality capture method. Unlike laser range finders, devices which measure the distance of single point at a time, 3D laser scanners could be explained like 360 versions of the same, only much more versatile and able to measure multiple ten thousands and up to a million points in a second, precisely capturing the X, Y, and Z coordinate of each point in space. In the case of 3D laser scanner, the scanner's head rotates around the center, taking measurements from the devices center point to the objects surrounding it, producing this way a 3D cloud of points, or a point cloud. Laser beams which miss the target, lose their power, fade away, and get lost forever, never returning to the device to register as a 3D point. This complete concept is one more proof that technology development is much more about evolution than revolution, right?

Preparing Data Received from Laser Scanners
Okay, so let's get familiarized with Autodesk ReCap interface. As you can see, it's quite simplified, and it's changing all the time from one version to the other because Autodesk is trying to simplify the interface as much as possible. This is mainly due to the way how people interact with computers these days, mainly by using mouse and keyboard, but more and more frequently by using touch screens. In the middle of the screen there's the preview of the latest project we worked on, and in the lower left corner there are previews of other projects we recently opened up, as is noted here. And in the lower right corner there is the Autodesk logo and the exit sign. What you'll use the most, though, is the new project icon, open project icon, preferences icon, and maybe if you're stuck the help icon.