Building Native Mobile Apps for SAP Business Warehouse - Part 1

Become a professional architect who can build cross-platform native apps both on iOS and Android using Xamarin, integrated with SAP. This course also answers how to achieve close to 100-percent code sharing using the newest Xamarin Forms.
Course info
Rating
(16)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jul 23, 2014
Duration
4h 16m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(16)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jul 23, 2014
Duration
4h 16m
Description

In this course, I'm going to show you how to create a ready-to-use tablet app on iOS and on Android-based smartphones that can communicate with SAP Business Warehouse. This course is a journey through technological layers, like preparing the database and the service layer in SAP BW and using Xamarin for developing the proxy in a shared code library. By the end of this course you will be able to integrate Xamarin and SAP BW perfectly together and create your own helpful tools for mobile devices.

About the author
About the author

Laszlo is an official certified SAP BW/BI consultant and trainer with over 10 years of IT experience. He specializes in SAP Business Warehouse/Business Intelligence but also enthusiastic about other solutions like ABAP, C# and new software practices.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

User Interface and Final Steps
Hi. My name is Laszlo Meszaros from Pluralsight, and welcome to this module about the User Interface and Final Steps. With this module, we arrive to our last milestone in our development. In this module, I am going to show you how to link our Xamarin. Forms common layout to mobile applications. The workflow will be very easy, since we will just glue the different parts together with references. At the end of this module, you will see that we could maximize our code sharing. I was very curious about the percentage of the shared code in our current Project Ranker app, and we could achieve a 94% shared code. This means that only 6% of the code is distributed between the Android and IOS specific projects. Of course, during this course we applied the same strategy for both devices. We didn't plan different layouts for a tablet and for a smartphone. In a real-life project, the code sharing might be lower in cases when we want to optimize the layouts more for the device, but still this amount is very inviting. Any increase in the shared code opens the opportunity that we can target more devices or markets, and our app is fast since it's running natively on the targeted platform. Join me to the next clips where I'm going to configure first the Android and then the IOS project.