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C# Interfaces

This course will teach you how C# interfaces can help add flexibility to your applications.
Course info
Rating
(18)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jun 23, 2021
Duration
2h 44m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(18)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jun 23, 2021
Duration
2h 44m
Description

Code that is easy to maintain, extend, and test is key to applications that can move quickly to meet your users’ needs. In this course, C# Interfaces, you’ll learn to use interfaces to add flexibility to your code. First, you’ll explore the mechanics (“What are interfaces?”) and why you want to use them. Next, you’ll discover how to create your own interfaces to make it easy to change or swap out functionality. Finally, you’ll learn about default member implementation and how to avoid some common stumbling blocks. When you’re finished with this course, you’ll have the skills and knowledge of C# interfaces needed to write application code that is easy to maintain, extend, and test.

About the author
About the author

Jeremy Clark is an application developer, technical speaker, and Microsoft MVP with over 13 years of experience in all aspects of the development lifecycle. After hours, he puts together demos and technical articles for JeremyBytes.com, a website focusing on .NET technologies.

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C# Interfaces
Intermediate
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Dec 19, 2018
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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Jeremy Clark. Welcome to my course, C# Interfaces. I am a technical speaker and trainer who makes developers better. I struggled for a long time with interfaces, but after getting a good understanding, I found that interfaces help make my code easier to maintain, extend, and test. This course is a practical introduction to understanding interfaces and how to get over the hurdles that developers struggle with. Some of the major topics that we will cover include making our code more flexible by using interfaces, creating our own interface to connect an application to different data sources, using default implementation to extend our interfaces, and comparing interfaces and abstract classes. By the end of this course, you'll be comfortable using and implementing interfaces in your own code, and that can make code easier to maintain, extend, and test. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with the basic features and syntax of the C# language, including methods, classes, and inheritance. And after completing the course, you should feel comfortable diving into courses on dependency injection, design patterns, and unit testing. I hope you'll join me on this journey to better C# with the C# Interfaces course at Pluralsight.