CG101: Dynamics

With this tutorial, we will take a software-independent look at some of the vital terminology required to build a solid foundation for learning some basics of dynamics. Software required: none.
Course info
Rating
(10)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 16, 2012
Duration
5m
Table of contents
Introduction and Project Overview
CG101: Dynamics
Description
Course info
Rating
(10)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 16, 2012
Duration
5m
Description

With this tutorial, we will take a software-independent look at some of the vital terminology required to build a solid foundation for learning some basics of dynamics. The purpose of these standalone lessons is not to learn how to use any specific software, but rather to focus on learning fundamental terminology. It is recommended that you are familiar with all of the terminology discussed throughout these lessons before starting to follow along with any dynamic simulation tutorials. Software required: none.

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About the author

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
In this lesson, we will learn about dynamics. Often time you want to animate objects in your scene to look like real-world forces or simulated forces are actually acting on them. For example, we have these objects that we want to hit and interact with in this scene in a very natural way. Trying to hand-animate all of these objects would become tedious, and often will not produce the best results. You will end up with thousands of key frames, and most likely it won't look right even after hours or even days of work. By hooking up the objects to a simulated force like gravity and allowing the software application to simulate the animation, the final results can be dramatic. You can see that our object takes on a realistic path of movement and interacts with our scene correctly. Now, this can speed up your work flow, and allow you to get very realistic animations with a short amount of work. The 3D animation package is actually simulating the objects frame by frame and will use this information when creating your final animation. Now, particle simulations, rigid and soft body simulations, and even cloth simulations are all typically considered dynamics. Now, this is an amazing area of the 3D software package that will require you to do lots of experimentation and exploration. And by integrating the dynamics into your skill set, what you'll actually do is increase your knowledge of the overall understanding of the software application that you're using. So next time you find yourself animating lots of objects by hand, see if a simulation can save you some time.