CG101: Graphic Design

With this tutorial, we will take a software independent look at some of the vital terminology that is required to build a solid foundation for learning some basics of graphic design.
Course info
Rating
(11)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 16, 2012
Duration
16m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(11)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 16, 2012
Duration
16m
Description

With this tutorial, we will take a software independent look at some of the vital terminology that is required to build a solid foundation for learning some basics of graphic design. The purpose of these standalone lessons is not to learn how to use any specific software, but rather to focus on learning fundamental terminology. It is recommended that you are familiar with all of the terminology that is discussed throughout these lessons before starting to follow along with any graphic design tutorials.

About the author
About the author

Digital-Tutors author.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
<<MUSIC PLAYING>> In this lesson, we will learn about aliasing and anti-aliasing. Almost all new artists working with computer graphics will face the question, should I anti-alias or not? Well let's take a look at what aliasing is, and how to identify it. Aliasing occurs often in computer graphics because each pixel is processed and displayed as a solid square of color. For example, if we take a look at the edge of this logo, you can see that the logo is black and the edge of the graphic is very clear. This causes a stair step artifact or also what is called the "Jaggies. " Because of this jagged edge, the computer generated images don't blend very well with their backgrounds. Anti-aliasing is the solution to the problem for Jaggies. What you lose in slower render times, you quickly pick up in the quality of the image. What anti-aliasing does is sample the foreground and background pixels along every edge, and shades the edge so it creates a smooth transition. This almost blurs the edge a little to create a smooth edge, so you end up with a believable result. If possible, it's always a good idea to render with anti-aliasing. And gain that little extra quality your image deserves. <<MUSIC PLAYING>>