CG101: Lighting

With this tutorial, we will take a software independent look at some of the vital terminology that is required to build a solid foundation for learning some basics of lighting.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 16, 2012
Duration
12m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 16, 2012
Duration
12m
Description

With this tutorial, we will take a software independent look at some of the vital terminology that is required to build a solid foundation for learning some basics of lighting. The purpose of these standalone lessons is not to learn how to use any specific software, but rather to focus on learning fundamental terminology. It is recommended that you are familiar with all of the terminology that is discussed throughout these lessons before starting to follow along with any lighting or rendering tutorials.

About the author
About the author

Digital-Tutors author.

More from the author
CG101: Animation
Beginner
1h 4m
Apr 20, 2012
CG101: Cinematography
Beginner
13m
Apr 16, 2012
CG101: Graphic Design
Beginner
17m
Apr 16, 2012
More courses by Papa Georgio
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
<<MUSIC PLAYING>> In this lesson, we will learn about spotlights. spotlights in 3D mimic spotlight in the real world. One of the key benefits of using a spotlight is the directionality that you get with the light. The light is emitted through a cone, and we can control how wide the cone angle is which determines how much of the area is illuminated. If a light is inside the ceiling or in a canister, you can create a spotlight to fit the opening so it looks like the outside is blocking the light. Think of a spotlight as a cone of light. You can adjust the outside of the cone, so it softer, or you can create a hard edge. Objects closer to the tip and center line of the code will be brighter. Take a look at this example of a flashlight. We want the light to come from the front of the flashlight and not illuminate the handle. A spotlight is perfect for this situation, because we can define exactly how wide the beam needs to be, all in the spotlight. Spotlights also have barn doors that can be activated which create a line that cuts off the light. barn doors give you further control over what areas the light is illuminating. These also help you focus the light and control the area illuminated. You can use barn doors to easily create light shining through a window or door. If the light you're trying to create needs to be in a conical shape or only illuminate a specific area, try using a spotlight. <<MUSIC PLAYING>>