CG101: Rigging

With this tutorial, we will take a software-independent look at some of the vital terminology required to build a solid foundation for learning how to build rigs for 3D models. Software required: none.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 16, 2012
Duration
14m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 16, 2012
Duration
14m
Description

With this tutorial, we will take a software-independent look at some of the vital terminology required to build a solid foundation for learning how to build rigs for 3D models. The purpose of these standalone lessons is not to learn how to use any specific software, but rather to focus on learning fundamental terminology. It is recommended that you are familiar with all of the terminology that is discussed throughout these lessons before starting to follow along with any rigging tutorials. Software required: none.

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About the author

Digital-Tutors author.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
In this lesson, we will learn about set-driven keys. Animating complex objects and characters will often require us to key frame a large number of pieces or joints. Having to set keys for all of these pieces individually can become tedious, time consuming, and an organizational nightmare. Using set-driven keys can help us to animate more efficiently and set fewer key frames. A set-driven key allows us to drive multiple objects and attributes with one control. For example, let's take a look at this hand. We can see that it might take a while to animate all of the fingers into a fist position, because of the large number of joints that must be individually key framed. By using a set-driven key we can now use one control to animate all of the joints into the desired position. A set-driven key consists of two parts, the driver and the driven. The driver is the object in control of the animation. In this instance, it's a control with a custom attribute called fist. Now although this driving attribute could really be any attribute on any object, we've just chosen this one and called it fist. The driven is the object and the attributes that are being controlled. The driven in this case is the rotation of the finger joints. We can set up a specific relationship between the fist attribute and the rotation of these finger joints. Now once the driver/driven relationship has been established, we can now key frame all of the fingers in and out of the fist position by simply key framing our new fist attribute. This set-driven keys can also be used to consolidate character controls, control mechanical doors or gears, or any number of complex animated actions. They are a great way to start animating multiple objects or attributes simpler and have much more efficiency when you go to work with them. So give them a try.