CG101: Texturing

With this tutorial, we will take a software-independent look at some of the vital terminology that is required to build a solid foundation for learning how to build textures for 3D models. Software required: none. Software required: .
Course info
Rating
(15)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 16, 2012
Duration
19m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(15)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 16, 2012
Duration
19m
Description

With this tutorial, we will take a software-independent look at some of the vital terminology that is required to build a solid foundation for learning how to build textures for 3D models. The purpose of these standalone lessons is not to learn how to use any specific software, but rather to focus on learning fundamental terminology. It is recommended that you are familiar with all of the terminology that is discussed throughout these lessons before starting to follow along with any texturing tutorials. Software required: none. Software required: .

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
In this lesson, we will learn about texture mapping. To create a surface that mimics real life, you usually have to turn to texture mapping. Texture mapping is the process of adding a bitmap or graphic to polygon surfaces. By using a bitmap file, you are not limited to the procedural shaders that come with your rendering system. Bitmap files can be any type of graphic, ranging from photographs to original designs. You can also use texture to help age your objects and give them more character. Most graphic design software packages will allow you the ability to take photographic reference and manipulate it to use as your texture. This may include extracting a portion of the graphic to use in a different area of your model. You also have the ability to paint your own textures, or to combine different graphics into one texture. By painting the textures by hand, you have a great deal of creative input and full control of the look you're trying to create. The texture files are then added to a shader network and applied to the polygon surface. This way, you can control not only the color information, but also the bump, transparency and many other attributes directly with a series of texture files.