Using the Takes System to Create Variation in CINEMA 4D

In this course, we will learn to use the new Takes system in CINEMA 4D to create variation in our scenes with a very flexible workflow. Software required: CINEMA 4D R17.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 26, 2016
Duration
37m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 26, 2016
Duration
37m
Description

When creating 3d projects, you'll often want to try out any number of settings or materials before you settle on a final result. You may want to see what your model looks like with a different style of accessory, or with a different color of label. Instead of saving out different file variations or duplicating materials, you can set up different takes for each variation and view each one very quickly from a single scene file. In this course, you'll learn to use the new Takes system in CINEMA 4D to add this kind of flexibility to your workflow. Software required: CINEMA 4D R17.

About the author
About the author

Justin thrives as a lead modeling author at Pluralsight. Growing up, Justin found a deep interest for the computer graphics industry after watching movies like Jurassic Park, Toy Story and The Abyss. His ambition would lead him to work at Sony Imageworks in Los Angeles on movies like Monster House and Surf's Up. Justin has also had numerous articles, tutorials and images published in 3D World and 3D Artist.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Justin Marshall. I'm a 3D modeling instructor here at Pluralsight, and I want to welcome you to Using the Take System to Create Variation in Cinema 4D. I'm really excited to teach you about this really flexible way of working with multiple project variations in Cinema 4D. We'll start by getting an overview of the Take Manager and how it can be used to organize our various takes. We'll learn to add overrides in order to change specific attributes on a per take basis. We'll also cover the use of Auto Take to quickly make changes across our different takes, and we'll learn to save and export our takes out. We'll continue by creating override groups, and learn to render and annotate our takes. By the end of this course you'll know the basics of working with the new Take System in Cinema 4D. But before you begin the course you should be familiar with some of the basic functionality of Cinema 4D. So I hope you'll join me and learn to use the Take System in Cinema 4D to create variation in your projects using this very flexible workflow.