Enterprise WAN Network Design for Cisco CCDP ARCH (300-320)

In this course, you'll learn fundamental knowledge of and gain the ability to design enterprise wide area networks (WAN). These include the design aspects of WAN connectivity, resilient WANs, extranet WANs, and Internet edge design.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Feb 23, 2018
Duration
1h 13m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Feb 23, 2018
Duration
1h 13m
Description

Enterprise wide area networks (WAN) are essential for connecting different networks together. In this course, Enterprise WAN Network Design for Cisco CCDP ARCH (300-320), the third course of the Cisco CCDP ARCH (300-320) path, you'll learn the necessary knowledge to design enterprise wide area networks, and prepare for the CCDP exam. First, you'll cover WAN connectivity design aspects, such as private lines and virtual private network solutions. Next, you'll explore resilient WAN design techniques, including multi-homed networks, backup connections, and failover. Then, you'll learn about designing extranet WANs, including VPN vs. private line, and multi-tenant extranets. Finally, you'll discover the methods of integrating your internet edge into your network, including DMZ, network address translation, and proxies. By the end of this course, you'll have a solid understanding of enterprise WAN network design, and you'll be on your way to passing the 300-320 exam.

About the author
About the author

Josh is a network consultant who has travelled around the world to ply his trade. He holds an MS in Applied Information from the University of Oregon, as well as the coveted Cisco CCIE, the ISC2 CISSP, and an array of other IT certifications.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Joshua Burman, and welcome to my course, Enterprise WAN Network Design for CCDP ARCH (300-320). I am a CCIE and independent network consultant at Convergency Consulting, LLC. Enterprise wide area networks are essential for connecting different networks together, and they are required knowledge for the Cisco Certified Design Professional exam. In this course, we are going to discuss the various design aspects of enterprise-wide area networks. Some of the major topics we will cover include designing WAN connectivity, designing a resilient WAN, designing extranet WAN connectivity, and designing the internet edge. By the end of this course, you'll have an intermediate level of enterprise wide area network design knowledge. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with basic network design at a Cisco Certified Design Associate, CCDA, level. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn enterprise WAN network design concepts, with the Enterprise WAN Network Design course for CCDP ARCH (300-320), at Pluralsight.

Designing a Resilient WAN
Hello, and welcome everybody. My name is Joshua Burman, CCIE #28039. This module is on Designing a Resilient WAN. It is part of the Enterprise WAN Network Design course for the Cisco Certified Design Professional ARCH exam, #300-320. In this module, we'll talk about WAN topologies, including single-homed topologies and multi-homed topologies. We'll then talk about backup connections, including floating static routes and object tracking and IP SLA. Then we'll talk about Cisco IWAN and SDN. Finally, we'll have a case study. Let's get started. When designing our WAN, we have a number of topologies to choose from. First, we have full mesh. With a full mesh, all sites require direct connectivity to one another. Full mesh networks can be difficult and expensive to scale, because as we add additional sites, we must also add additional links to all existing sites. Next we have a partial mesh. With a partial mesh, specific sites require additional connectivity between them, but a full mesh is not needed. Additional sites can be added with only the minimum connectivity required. Then we have hub and spoke. Hub and spoke is a good topology to link many small branch sites to a single large headquarter site. For redundancy, dual hubs can be used. Next, with a ring topology, each side is connected to two other sites to form a ring. If any link goes down, traffic can travel in the opposite direction. We can also combine topologies together. For instance, we can have a partial mesh WAN for our headquarters' manufacturing and distributing while utilizing a hub and spoke design for sales offices.