Cisco CCNA Data Center: Nexus, Advanced Switching & SAN

A course focused on several topics tested in the 640-916 exam required for the CCNA Data Center.
Course info
Rating
(134)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 27, 2014
Duration
4h 26m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(134)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 27, 2014
Duration
4h 26m
Description

The CCNA Data Center covers a wide range of technologies found in the data center. In this course, we dive deep into LAN architecture with the Cisco Nexus line of switches, their specific use cases, and how to perform initial setup and configuration. We'll also look at advanced switching techniques, such as Virtual Port Channels, FabricPath, and Virtual Device Contexts (VDCs). Finally, we'll switch gears and focus on Storage Area Network (SAN) design and implementation with the Cisco MDS line of switches, including port types, Virtual SAN (VSAN), zoning, masking, and Fabric Login (FLOGI).

About the author
About the author

Chris Wahl has acquired over a decade of IT experience in enterprise infrastructure design, implementation, and administration. He has provided architectural and engineering expertise in a variety of virtualization, data center, and cloud based engagements while working with high performance technical teams on global reaching environments.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Network Architecture
Hello, and welcome to a module on Network Architecture. This module is going to focus pretty heavily on Modular LAN Design, and how that impacts the different topologies and architectures available to you as a network engineer or architect. Now I wanted to call out that the previous course that covers the 940-911 exam is much more focused on routing and switching, and different protocols used to accomplish routing and switching. This course is focused very heavily on what's covered in the 640-916 exam, which is really more holistically round the components in the Data Center, so with that out of the way there are three major layers that we're going to discuss in this module, the first being the Core Layer, the Core Layer usually comprises of something like a Nexus 7000 series switch, if we're talking Nexus. And in the past it could be something like a Catalyst 6500 switch. The next layer is the Aggregation Layer, which was formerly documented as the distribution layer, so if your looking at some Cisco documentation, or your searching for something online, you might see it called the Distribution Layer, and that's pretty much been changed now in all the new documentation to the Aggregation Layer, that term better serves what it does. The Aggregation Layer talks upstream into the Core, and downstream to the Access Layer, the Access Layer is where we actually attach our edge devices, like servers, and workstations, and even IP phones. We're also going to cover a different type of model, called the Collapse Core Model, and this is where we essentially take the Core and Distribution or Aggregation Layers, and combine them so that we have a smaller topology that consists of just the Core Layer, and the Access Layer. So let's get started.

FabricPath
Hello, and welcome to this module on Cisco FabricPath. In this module we're going to talk about how FabricPath compares to something like Classical Ethernet. If you've not heard that term used before, it's basically just talking about the Ethernet that you know and love today. We'll compare the protocol of FabricPath, as well as different topologies to what you're probably used to in your LAN today, or what you've been learning about in previous modules. We'll also discuss implementing FabricPath, specifically around the hardware that you'll need, and the software that's required in order to be successful with FabricPath, so let's get cracking.

Virtual Port Channels (vPC)
Hello, and welcome to a module on Virtual Port Channels. To kick things off we'll start with the Technology Overview, we'll look at Historical methods that have been used to take two switches that you see here and logically combine them together. And then we'll compare those against Virtual Port Channels, we'll also look at the components and the configuration necessary to work with Virtual Port Channels, and actually deploy it into an environment. So let's get started.

Nexus Product Family
Hello, and welcome to a module on the Nexus Product Family. This module will focus on an overview of the various Nexus Switches that are covered in the Data Center series exams. Specifically the Nexus 7000 series, which is the large often Core switch that is deployed into a Data Center. The 5000 series switch, which is a great kind of Swiss army knife switch, it fits in the Aggregation Layer, sometimes it's used as an Access switch. And the Nexus 2000 series switch, which is often called a FEX, or Fabric Extender. And finally we'll go over some of the licensing, specifically grace period information that's necessary to be successful with Nexus switch, so let's get started.

Modular Switch Architecture
Hello, and welcome to a module on Modular Switch Architecture. Much of our focus in this particular module will be on what creates a Modular Switch Architecture. And that really ends up being the idea of planes, and not this kind of plane that's definitely not what we're talking about, but more around the Control Plane, and the Data Plane. We'll also do a discussion around Virtual Device Contexts, which is a VDC, it's a way that we can virtualize portions of a switch. And the initial setup process for a Nexus switch. So I hope you're just as excited as I am to get this module started.

Advanced Switching Concepts
Hello and welcome to a module on Advanced Switching Concepts. Now like it says, we're going to focus on a few advanced functions and features that are available on the Nexus line of switches. To begin we'll focus on virtual routing and forwarding, otherwise known as VRF, along with configuration and conductivity tasks that are necessary to be successful with VRF. We'll also do an overview and dig into the command structure and dictionary terminology used with the Overlay Transport Virtualization technology also known as OTV. And with that let's get started.

SAN Design with Cisco MDS
Hello and welcome to a module on SAN Design with Cisco MDS. We're going to start by focusing on SAN Design itself, specifically the core-edge model and the collapsed core model. We'll transition into talking about port types, these are important for connecting nodes to the fabric and doing trunking between switches with EISL or maybe just switch to switch communication with ISL. And we're going to kind of look at the old school method of doing SAN with arbitrated loop. We're then going to into details and differences between MDS edge switches and MDS core switches. Moving on to virtual SAN or VSAN and discussing how that's used to logically carve up your SAN. And finally we're going to go over the initial set up of a Cisco MDS switch. So it's a lot on our plate, let's get started.

SAN Connectivity
Hello and welcome to a module on storage area network connectivity, which we will just call SAN because that's less words for me to say. And it sounds kind of cooler too. So let's dive right in. What is SAN connectivity and what are we going to talk about in this lesson? Well the first thing we're going to go over is creating aliases. Because dealing with device-ids and worldwide names works for computers but me personally I have trouble reading a 16 character hexadecimal value. It doesn't really scream initiator target or blade or whatever. So we're going to look at two different methods, both fcalias and device-alias so that we can put some human friendly names onto some very long and ugly looking values with the device. The next thing we'll look at is zoning or the creation of zones. And this is how we're going to create relationships between initiators and targets. And it's basically how we're going to control what initiator can talk to what target. We'll also dive a little bit into masking, which is a storage array technology that's basically we're going to limit what the initiator can see once it connects to the storage array. We'll also look into zone sets, which really if you want to just boil it down it's just a collection of zones. It's a way that we can take many, many zones and pile them into a zone set and then we can make that an active topology for our fabric. It's basically we're allowing multiple zones to be active and useable at one given time. And finally we'll look at fabric login, which has the really cool name FLOGI, doesn't that just roll right off the tongue. And in FLOGI we're going to be looking at how devices log into the fabric and get there FCIDs. So, you know, roll your sleeves back, fill up a nice hot cup of coffee, or some Red Bull or whatever it is, maybe you like water, I don't know, and let's get started.