Cloud Foundry for Developers

Learn how to build PaaS-friendly applications that can be deployed and managed in a Cloud Foundry environment. See how to use a full range of Cloud Foundry capabilities for modern web applications.
Course info
Rating
(196)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jan 7, 2015
Duration
2h 51m
Table of contents
PaaS and Cloud Foundry Introduction
Deploying and Managing Applications (Part I)
Deploying and Managing Applications (Part II)
Cloud Foundry Advanced Topics
Description
Course info
Rating
(196)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jan 7, 2015
Duration
2h 51m
Description

Cloud Foundry is a popular and powerful open-source Platform-as-a-Service for modern web applications. This course describes the best practices for designing PaaS applications, and walks through the deployment and management of a multi-tier web application.

About the author
About the author

Richard Seroter is the VP of Product Marketing at Pivotal, with a master’s degree in Engineering from the University of Colorado. He’s also an 11-time Microsoft MVP for cloud, an instructor for Pluralsight, the lead InfoQ.com editor for cloud computing, and author of multiple books. As Vice President at Pivotal, Richard leads product, customer, technical, and partner marketing teams. Richard maintains a regularly updated blog on topics of architecture and solution design and can be found on Twitter as @rseroter.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Deploying and Managing Applications (Part I)
Hi, my name is Richard Seroter and welcome to the second module in the course about platform as a service and using Cloud Foundry for building and deploying applications. In this module, we're actually going to get down and dirty with configuring apps, deploying them, monitoring them and administering them in Cloud Foundry. Specifically, we're going to talk about Cloud Foundry Spaces. How do you log in with other parameters? What's the difference between an organization and a space? We'll talk about application services and how do you provision those? How do you create service instances? And we'll do that. We'll then actually deploy and explore an application. We'll go ahead and take our reference architecture and push that out to Cloud Foundry, so we can work with it. We're going to scale and update applications that we've deployed and look at the settings for that then we'll talk about troubleshooting applications. How do you handle the inevitable problems that will come up as you deploy or manage or scale or application-specific errors? How do you dig into that when you're dealing with an offsite sort of application fabric that doesn't necessarily give you the same sort of hooks you might be used to. Now, I'm actually going to break this up into two kinda part one and part two modules and so, this isn't a one mega module. So, this first one's going to focus more on the spaces, the servicing, kinda setting up for deployment. The second piece will handle the plans, deployment and scaling, kinda keep your brain from melting all in one phase. I thought to split this up into two for you. Look at the reference architecture for this course. We talked about this in the last module but we're going to be making a donation application, very simple but really the point was showing multiple layers where we have a web tier in Ruby on Rails. We have a JavaScript no-js tier for API and we have an external MongoDB service that's going to provide our persistent backing store for donation information.

Deploying and Managing Applications (Part II)
In the first part of this mega module, we really looked at the kind of the set up of this. Right setting up deployment, what does it mean to do deployments manifest, what happens during deployments and then we set up our environment to kind of have some functional parody on premises so that we could push to the cloud. In the second part of the module, of the two-parter, we're going to look at actually doing the deployments and the trouble shooting and the scaling and so forth. So we just finished building out the environment locally, hopefully pretty exciting. Getting a ruby node mongo app running completely within one, kind of isolated workspace either on your desktop or in a cloud server. Now the next step is how do we actually deploy this? Let's deploy it to cloud foundry. Let's start the CLI, which we're going to do, we're gonna create a cfignore file, just so we don't push all of the node modules up to the server. And then we're going to go push the application and test it out. This should be a lot simpler now cause now we don't have to do any a lot of the maintenance that we just did to install ruby and configure things. All of that's in the paths, all of that sitting in cloud foundry it's all configured, all we need to do is push our application to that fabric. Let's go ahead and jump in.

Cloud Foundry Advanced Topics
Hi, my name is Richard Seroter, welcome to this third module in a course about platform as a service using cloud foundry to build and manage applications. In this particular module we're going to look at a few advanced scenarios around resilience and configuration that build on what we've done so far but show you some more sophisticated scenarios. So what were going to cover is first we're going to talk about environment variables, how do I store the information about my application runtime in environment variables, not have to rely on configuration values or configuration values or cofiguration files, things like that, instead use environment variables. We'll talk about background applications, how do I run worker roles that don't have a public facing route but can do some asynchronous processing of data? We'll talk about no-downtime updates, so we showed in the previous modules how you can do deployments and do updates but when you push you do typically take your application off-line. How can I handle a no downtime update scenario? Then finally, we'll play with application crash and recovery scenarios, look at some of the built-in resiliency that Cloud Foundry offers.