Continuous Integration

Continuous integration techniques with MSBuild, TeamCity, NUnit, NCover, FxCop, and Microsoft Web Deploy
Course info
Rating
(534)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Dec 10, 2010
Duration
2h 34m
Table of contents
A Gentle Introduction
Minimum Requirements
Building a Solution
Build Scripts
Integrating External Tools
Deployment Automation
Description
Course info
Rating
(534)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Dec 10, 2010
Duration
2h 34m
Description

This course introduces the theory and practice of continuous integration (CI). Students are shown how to set up a build server for CI and create build scripts using MSBuild to manage the overall build process. Different aspects of a build pipeline are explored including code compilation, testing, coverage, static code analysis, packaging, and deployment. This course is appropriate for developers new to the practice of continuous integration.

About the author
About the author

James Kovacs is a Technical Evangelist for JetBrains. He is passionate in sharing his knowledge about OO, SOLID, TDD/BDD, testing, object-relational mapping, dependency injection, refactoring, continuous integration, and related techniques.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

A Gentle Introduction
Hi, my name is James Kovacs of Pluralsight. This series of modules is on Continuous Integration, all the way from concepts to full implementation of a Continuous Integration system. In this first module, we're going to be talking about what exactly is Continuous Integration, what problems does Continuous Integration solve, and some of the benefits of using a Continuous Integration system. One of the things that we want to avoid is the dreaded works on my machine. You have a group of developers, source has been checked into your source control system, and it only works on one person's machine and not everybody else's. Continuous Integration attempts to solve this problem and encourages you to look at a full-fledged Build Process. When you first start having these problems, you might go from an Ad Hoc mechanism of building, where some developer will check the coded on their computer, and get latest, and do a build, make sure everything's okay, to a more automated process of a Daily Build. The daily build every night, someone or an automated process on a machine will get the latest contents of source control and actually build the entire system. Taking it a step further, we get to a Continuous Integration build, where a build is performed every time someone checks source code into your version control system.

Building a Solution
Hi, this is James Kovacs of Pluralsight. In this module, we will look at Building a Solution, both on your desktop and on the Continuous Integration server.

Build Scripts
Hi, this is James Kovacs of Pluralsight. In this module, we're going to be talking about Build Scripts.

Integrating External Tools
Hi. This is James Kovacs of Pluralsight. In this module we're going to look at integrating external tools into our build process.

Deployment Automation
Hi. This is James Kovacs of Pluralsight. In this module we're going to look at deployment automation. Specifically, we're going to look at how to incorporate packaging and deployment into our overall build process. We're also going to look at different options for preparing the server that will eventually receive our application. We'll be talking about overall deployment pipelines and finally wrapping it up with a discussion around continuous deployment.