Drawing Fundamentals

This course teaches you how to draw by hand, starting from the ground up. After taking this course, you will have a very strong foundational understanding of how to draw by hand.
Course info
Rating
(43)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Nov 15, 2016
Duration
3h 46m
Table of contents
Introduction to Drawing
Elements of Design
Principles of Design
Contour Drawing
Drawing Form with Value
Drawing the Human Face
Drawing a Portrait
Description
Course info
Rating
(43)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Nov 15, 2016
Duration
3h 46m
Description

In this course, Drawing Fundamentals, you will learn how to draw by hand, starting from the ground up. You will begin by learning the elements and principles of design, where you'll learn about line, shape, value, color, contrast, and many more of the building blocks of drawing and design. Then, you will get right into a observational drawing exercises, where you'll learn how to map out and draw an object with proper proportions using lines and values. Finally, you'll learn how to draw a human face, and then how to draw a portrait from a photo reference. After taking this course, you will have a very strong foundational understanding of how to draw by hand.

About the author
About the author

Shayna Piascik is an illustrator residing in Massachusetts. She received an MFA in Illustration from The Low Residency MFA in Illustration Program at The Hartford Art School, where they liked her so much, upon graduation they hired her as the Program Manager.

Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction to Drawing
In this course, I'll be teaching you Drawing Fundamentals. First, we'll go over the elements and principles of design. Learning the elements involves learning about line, shape, value, and others and the principles include pattern, contrast, emphasis, and more. Then, I will demonstrate basic exercises that build upon those concepts. You'll learn how to map out a drawing, learn contour drawing, and then learn about drawing form. Finally, we'll go over how to draw human facial features and then how to draw a portrait. When you're finished with this course, you'll have the foundational skills you'll need to progress as an artist.

Elements of Design
The elements of design are the essential components that an artist uses within a work of art that can be isolated and defined. They are line, shape, form, value, space, texture, and color. In this chapter, I'm going to teach you about each of these elements.

Principles of Design
In the previous chapter, we talked about the elements of design. In this chapter, I'm going to teach you about the principles of design. The principles of design describe the uses and visual effects of the elements within the composition. They are pattern, contrast, emphasis, balance, proportion, unity, and rhythm.

Contour Drawing
In the previous chapters, we learned about the elements and principles of design. Now we're going to elaborate more on line specifically. Although there are no actual outlines that exist in objects and nature, line allows us as artists to visually describe the shape of objects and the details within it. Line work can be the starring element of the drawing or it can be used as a foundation of a drawing that will later be hidden. In this exercise, we're going to focus on contour lines, simple, solid outlines. We will talk about mapping out a drawing on paper, as well as learning how to visual measure and compare their proportions and angles of an object that you're drawing. We'll also talk about line quality, line weight, and creating variety by describing surfaces and textures. For this exercise, you will draw the contour lines of a sneaker or shoe. Find a semi-interesting, semi-simple shoe. Place it a couple feet in front of you on a surface where your seating position will remain the same throughout the drawing. Let's get started.

Drawing Form with Value
In the previous chapter, we did a contour line drawing exercise. Taking what you learned about accurately mapping out your drawing on paper, we're going to move a step forward by drawing form. Drawing form means to draw the illusion of three dimensions. We see things three dimensionally because of light. Everything around us absorbs and reflects light. When there's not enough light, we have a hard time seeing, right? Object's unique shapes, structures, textures, and position relative to any light source affect how it appears to us allowing us to distinguish everything, even if you're color blind. When you're creating the illusion of form through rendering a drawing, you are communicating the structure and physicality with values, the gradual shifts in light and shadow. For this exercise, we're going to draw a sphere and a cone. Shading and variation in values will transform these objects from shapes into forms. We'll talk about light sources, contrast, shadows, and reflective light.

Drawing the Human Face
In this chapter, we're going to talk about the basic placement of features on a human face. We know that everyone has their own unique look, but where features are placed are about the same on everyone of a particular age group. There are standard or ideal proportions from which we can base portrait drawings from. You can follow along as I demonstrate the measurements of mapping out the drawing of a face.

Drawing a Portrait
The term, ideal proportions, is kind of deceptive and cruel because no one is perfect. We can use those ideal proportions though to identify what deviates from that to make that person's unique appearance. If you think someone has big ears, for example, ask yourself, what are they big compared to. It's all relative to the standard and the standard isn't necessarily the norm. I'm going to demonstrate a portrait drawing from a photograph. Ideally, you'll practice drawing many portraits from observation before you use the photograph as reference. You could try drawing a self-portrait from a mirror like a selfie.