Creating Printed Circuit Boards with EAGLE

This course will teach you how to create printed circuit boards using the EAGLE PCB software from Cadsoft. The course works through the design and construction of an actual project from start to finish: an LCD/Keypad shield for an Arduino UNO.
Course info
Rating
(45)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Nov 13, 2015
Duration
1h 55m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(45)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Nov 13, 2015
Duration
1h 55m
Description

If you are an electronics enthusiast and need to make circuit boards for your electronic projects, then EAGLE, a professional quality PCB software program, allows you to go from an experimental designs to a completed circuit board. It is available in a free version for non-commercial use. This course works through a sample project, an LCD/keypad shield for an Arduino UNO, and teaches the schematic creation, board layout, and manufacturing functions of EAGLE. The course wraps up with the actual assembly and testing of the circuit. Sample code for the Arduino, as well as all the EAGLE files, are provided for the demo circuit. You will gain a full understanding of the application and concepts that can be used to design boards for other development platforms or their own circuit applications.

About the author
About the author

Gord is a Professional Engineer and President of GHM Engineering Group. He has extensive experience in electronics, controls and automation. He has presented and trained on subjects in industrial automation, electricity and electronics. He lives in the Niagara Wine Country in Ontario Canada with his wife and their eight children.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Trailer
Hi everyone, my name is Gordon Maretzki, and welcome to my course Creating Printed Circuit Boards with EAGLE. I'm a professional engineer and I run my own engineering company, GHM Engineering Group. Anyone with access to a personal computer and software such as EAGLE can make even the most complex boards from their desktop. In this course we're going to walk through the design and construction of an actual printed circuit board using the free version of EAGLE. When done we'll have a working circuit of an LCD display shield, complete with keypad for an Arduino UNO. Some of the major topics that we will cover include, drawing a schematic in the schematic editor, laying out the board in the layout editor, generating manufacturing files with the CAM processor, and finally assembling the circuit and testing the operation with a simple Arduino sketch. By the end of the course you will have great understanding of the EAGLE software and you will be able to apply the concepts learned to design your own boards for further development or commercialization. Before beginning the course you should be familiar with basic electronics and circuit prototyping. Familiarity with the Arduino platform and IDE would be an asset, but not absolutely necessary. I hope you'll join me in this journey to learn printed circuit boards with the Creating Printed Circuit Boards with EAGLE course at Pluralsight.

Getting It All Together
In this module, we will get everything together. We will actually populate our circuit board, and then meet it with the Arduino UNO. We'll fire up the Arduino IDE, and write some code so that we can test our buttons and display. Now is the time to start enjoying the fruits of our labors. For this board to work, we need to populate it with components. We have very specifically designed this board to be hand built. Because of that, when choosing the components, I chose through hole components, which are easier for me to solder, and assemble by hand. When you are designing your board, have your end result in mind, and choose your footprints accordingly. Surface mount components are more compact. The packages are usually much smaller than their through whole counterparts. If compactness is part of your design, you will eventually want to start using these components, and start focusing on automated assembly. Surface mount components or devices, SMDs, are better suited to modern automated equipment. Most commercial boards are a combination of SMDs, and a smaller representation of through hole devices. Take a look at your Arduino UNO, and see if you can spot the through hole, and SMD devices. In the next segment, I populate and solder the components into our bare board. Are you ready?