The Eclipse Guided Tour - Part 2

Continue the Journey you started in part 1 of The Eclipse Guided Tour. Learn to organize your workspace, explore the full power of the debugger, customize the Eclipse.ini file and extend the capabilities of Eclipse with plug-ins.
Course info
Rating
(71)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Dec 18, 2013
Duration
3h 26m
Table of contents
Continue the Journey
Workspace vs Project
Eclipse Variables
Code Templates in Depth
Debugging
Advanced Tips and Tricks
Adding Plug-ins
Description
Course info
Rating
(71)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Dec 18, 2013
Duration
3h 26m
Description

Eclipse really is a full-featured IDE. If you’re just using it as a glorified editor and compiler then you’re missing out. The debugger is extremely powerful and the time you spend learning it will most likely be repaid many times over. Knowing how to solve problems and optimize performance by modifying the Eclipse.ini can be a life-saver. However, you need to be armed with some basic knowledge. If Eclipse doesn’t do everything you need in your workflow, chances are good you can find a plug-in that will add any critical missing functionality. We’ll explore all this and more in part 2 of the Eclipse Guided Tour.

About the author
About the author

Tod has been programming anything he can get his hands on since 1980 when he accidentally discovered an Apple ][ at Argonne National Labs.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Advanced Tips and Tricks
Welcome to the Advanced Tips and Tricks module of the Eclipse Guided Tour. My name is Tod Gentille. This module is a collection of items that really didn't fit well into any other category and seemed either too esoteric or too advanced for Part 1 of this course. There are three main sections to this module. Part 1 will cover two language specific tidbits that are stand-alone topics, Part 2 will delve into more detail on managing projects and files, and in Part 3 I want to explore in depth some details about how you can configure Eclipse using the ini configuration file. The first demo will be for the C++ users and cover setting up a C++ user spelling dictionary. Starting with the Juno release this got much simpler. In Indigo and prior versions I suffered along without a custom dictionary for longer than I'd like to admit before I figured out what I was doing wrong. I'll bring up Indigo to show you the trick just in case you're required to use an older version of Eclipse. For the Java users, I want to talk about the Java scrapbook page. I mentioned this page in the Debugging topic on the Display window, but I never actually showed it to you, so for the sake of completeness we'll go over it. It's useful, but in my mind it has lots of room for improvement.

Adding Plug-ins
Welcome to the Adding Plug-ins module of the Eclipse Guided Tour. My name is Tod Gentille. Eclipse is a modular expandable development platform. The easiest way to get additional functionality into Eclipse is to install a new plug-in. There are now two ways you can find and install new plug-ins. The old way, and it's still useful because not all plug-ins are available the new way, is to search the web looking for the functionality you desire. The default Eclipse Install also has a couple of software sites built-in so you can also explore those, although the amount of information available is somewhat limited. If you found a plug-in you want from an available software site, installing it is pretty straightforward. If you found it on the web, it might not support installing directly from the site. If not, you can typically install plug-ins manually. Then there's the new way, the Eclipse marketplace. It's available from the Help menu inside Eclipse. Once you open it you have many options, including the ability to select among various provided Marketplaces. There are also Tabs that allow you to filter by the most recent or the most popular. There is also a built-in search capability. You can use the dropdown list to filter by plug-ins that are tools or full rich client platform applications. You can also filter by a variety of categories. In most cases, plug-ins found via the Marketplace can be installed by simply pressing the Install button. There's even a Tab that allows you to see what plug-ins are already installed. In the upcoming demo, we're going to look at installing one plug-in using each method. We'll dig into the available site to find some better html editing tools and we'll also look at the process of adding a new software site. We'll also take a quick look at the manual process of adding a plug-in. Then we'll use the Marketplace to find and install support from Mercurial, a distributed version control system. Let's switch over to Eclipse.