Making Your First Game in GameMaker: Studio

This course will familiarize you with GameMaker: Studio and will help you create your first arcade game. Learn how to complete a game for your friends, family, or simply yourself to play. Software required: GameMaker: Studio v1.4 or higher.
Course info
Rating
(18)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Oct 3, 2016
Duration
1h 28m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(18)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Oct 3, 2016
Duration
1h 28m
Description

Have you ever had an idea for a video game, but don't know how to build it? If so, Making Your First Game with GameMaker: Studio is the perfect course for you because you'll learn how to build, test, and publish your very own 2D video game. First, you'll learn how to create and program your game assets. Next, you'll learn how to build levels and play-test your game. Finally, you'll add the finishing touches, like sound and score, before exporting your game. When you're finished with this course, you'll not only have a game that you can play and share with other people, but you'll also have enough knowledge with the software to start experimenting and building the game you have always wanted to make. Software required: GameMaker: Studio v1.4 or higher.

About the author
About the author

Bryan is a game designer that specializes in 2D games, but has studied animation and 3D modeling. While he has industry experience, he is more passionate about teaching. Through his experiences with teaching STEM education through video games, Bryan has decided that learning is most effective when it’s fun.

More from the author
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Bryan Sekine, and welcome to my course Making Your First Game with GameMaker: Studio. I am an instructor, a course creator, and an entrepreneur for my own company, Bryan Sekine Design. GameMaker: Studio is a fun, free platform for designing your very own 2D video games. Whether you're new to the industry or you're wanting to create a 2D mock-up for your game concept, GameMaker: Studio has something for everyone. In this course, we're going to cover the fundamentals of creating your first game. Some of the major topics we'll cover include creating and animating sprites, creating and programing objects, adding sounds and music to your game, and creating rooms or levels and transitioning from one room to the next. By the end of this course, you'll know how to create your very first game and expand on that information. This course is a quick introduction to GameMaker: Studio, and no prior experience is required. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn game design with the course, Making Your First Game with GameMaker: Studio at Pluralsight.

Creating Sprites, Objects, and Rooms
Hello, and welcome to module 2, Creating Sprites, Objects, and Rooms. In this first clip, I'm going to cover what each of these terms mean and what they do for our game. In the rest of the clips for this module, we will learn how to create each one and import the materials I've created for you. If you haven't downloaded the materials. zip file for this course, please take a moment to do so before moving on. A sprite is simply the visual representation of an object. Think of it like the label on a bottle of water. A sprite's main purpose is to show the player where the objects are located within the game, but sprites also define the boundaries of the object, as well as control the animation of the object. We will go over this in more detail in the following clip. An object is the container for all the programming that we will be doing within GameMaker. Think of the object as the bottle itself and the programming as the water. If the object has a sprite assigned to it, then the player will be able see the object within the game. However, objects can also be invisible if they don't have a sprite assigned to them. These invisible objects are referred to as controller objects because they control all of the behind the scenes programming. A room can be described as the level for a game. Rooms contain the objects for our game, as well as controlling certain environmental settings, such frame rate, speed, and boundaries. Okay, that's enough terminology for now. Click on the next clip, and let's start making our game.

Programming Objects
Hello, and welcome to the module, Programming Objects. In this first clip, I'm going to go over the basic process of programming an object in GameMaker: Studio, and in the following clips I'll cover how each object will be individually programmed. If you haven't done so already, open the. gmx file that we were working on from the previous module. To start programming an object that you have already created, or to reopen an object that you were previously programming, double-click on the object's name. This will open up the Object Properties window in the workspace. The center column of that window is labeled Events. This is where all of our programming will start. You can think of an event as a type of trigger that will initiate a series of commands that we give to an object. At the bottom in that column, you'll see three buttons, Add Event, Delete, and Change. When you click on Add Event, a new window will appear that will give you a list of event types. As you can see, there are several types of events, including Key Press, Mouse, Create, and Step. For the sake of time, I'll only go over these different event types as they arise within our game. For a list of event types and what each of them do, check out the Course Material section of this module. Once you have an event in the Events column, you can highlight that event and either delete or change the event with the two buttons at the bottom of this column. In the column to the right labeled Actions, we will be adding the individual commands for our program. GameMaker: Studio has a built-in drag and drop user interface to make this part of the process easier. It's important to note that you can only drag an action over to the Actions panel if there's an event type selected. Now that we have a basic understanding of how programming works within GameMaker, let's get started on programming our game. Click on the next clip to see how.

Firing Bullets, Destroying Enemy Objects, and Keeping Score
Hello there, and welcome to the module Firing Bullets, Destroying Enemy Objects, and Keeping Score. Be sure you have your. gmx file open from the previous module. At this point, we should have our alien objects moving autonomously and firing bullets randomly, a player object that can move left and right, as well as wrap the screen, and our game should restart if the player object is hit with one of the alien bullets. But in this module, we're going to go over how to make our player object fire back, how to destroy the alien objects once they're hit, and how to keep score in our game. In the following clips, we're going to pull back the curtain a little bit and do some coding. GameMaker: Studio uses its own proprietary programming language known as GML, or GameMaker Language. If you have any prior experience with object-oriented programming, GML will seem very familiar to you. If you don't have any prior experience with programming, don't worry. I've simplified the coding as much as possible. You can also download the script text files in the Resource section of this module and simply copy and paste them into your game if you run into any coding problems. Now, to help differentiate between the two terms, I'm going to define them for this course. So when I say programming, I'm referring to the drag-and-drop functionality built within GameMaker. This is what we've been using for the previous modules. But when I say coding, I'm referring to writing script in the GameMaker Language. Alright, click on the next clip, and let's get started.

Adding Shields, Explosions, and Sounds
Hello there, and welcome to the module Adding Shields, Explosions, and Sounds. Be sure to have your. gmx file open from the previous module. As of right now, you should have a working prototype of your game, aliens that move around and fire bullets at you, a player character that can also move around and fire back, and a scoring system that not only shows you your current score, but also shows a high score table after you've been hit. In the following clips, I'm going to show you how to add some subtle finishing touches to your game that will really add to the player's experience. We're going to be creating some shields to hide behind, some explosions when the aliens are hit with bullets, and, of course, some sound effects. Click on the next clip to get started.

Checking Instances, Adding Levels, and Finalizing Your Game
Hello there, and welcome to the module Checking Instances, Adding Levels, and Finalizing Your Game. Right now we have a fully functional game, but it only has one level, also known as a room. In this module, we're going to go over how to check to see if there are aliens within our room, and if there aren't any, how to move on to the next room. We will also briefly review how to create rooms and how to create a final room in order to beat the game. Finally, we will cover how to export your game so that it can be played on any computer. Be sure to have your. gmx file open from the previous module so we can dive right in. Click on the next clip to get started.