Description
Course info
Rating
(24)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jan 20, 2017
Duration
1h 52m
Description

Follow along easily and get a great start to building your own apps. You don't even need a physical HoloLens device! In this course, HoloLens Development Fundamentals, you're going to be building a demo app that showcases the five main pillars of mixed reality experiences for HoloLens. First, you'll cover how to use gaze, gestures, and spatial mapping to manipulate a full 3D experience with natural interaction. Next, you'll learn how to create actions that handle basic or complex gestures, such as tap, navigate, or manipulate. Then, you'll discover how to design both voice commands and audio, and then implement them for your users to use. Finally, you'll go through how to take advantage of the holographic framework to implement both voice commands and spatial audio, with little effort, and bring your HoloLens app to life. By the end of this course, you'll have an understanding of what mixed reality apps are and how they are put together.

About the author
About the author

Lars is an author, trainer, Microsoft MVP, community leader, authority on all things Windows Platform, and part time crocodile wrangler. He is heavily involved in the space of HoloLens and mixed reality, as well as a published Pluralsight author, freelance solution architect, and writer for numerous publications.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Lars Klint and welcome to my course, HoloLens Development Fundamentals. I'm a freelance solution architect at Larsklint. com, Microsoft MVP, speaker, HoloLens developer and expert in Australian outback internet. I've been building software systems from tiny websites to gargantuan telecommunication systems for the past 20 years. In this course we're going to build a demo app that showcases the five main pillars of mixed reality experiences for HoloLens. You can follow along easily and get a great start in building your own app. You don't even need a physical HoloLens device. Learn to use gaze, gestures, and spatial mapping to manipulate a full 3D experience with natural interaction. Create actions that handle basic or complex gestures, such as tap, navigate, or manipulate. How about designing both voice commands in audio and then implement them for your users to use. Take advantage of the holographic framework to implement both voice commands and spatial audio with little effort and bring your HoloLens app to life. But that isn't all. We will also cover the free software used to develop for HoloLens, Unity 3D and Visual Studio. By the end of this course you'll have an understanding of what mixed reality apps are and how they're put together, as well as having built your own. To complete the course all you need is a Microsoft account and the free community edition of Visual Studio 2015 and a Personal edition of Unity 3D. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn how to build HoloLens apps with the HoloLens Development Fundamental course at Pluralsight.

Gaze, Gestures, and Spatial Mapping
To create an immersive and complete experience of HoloLens there are five main pillars to consider. In this module you'll learn about the first three. First we'll look at gaze, which is how you target objects in a mixed reality experience. Gaze is where your head is aiming and is equivalent to moving a mouse cursor. It is the most used of the pillars and you'll learn how to handle events and design a cursor experience. Second you'll learn about gesture events, use gestures and interact with the user through actions for different gestures. Gestures are equivalent to using the buttons on your mouse, as well as certain keys on your keyboard. Finally, you'll learn about spatial coordinate system and spatial mapping employed by the HoloLens. Spatial mapping is key to the mixed reality experience that interacts with your real world, such as placing holograms on the couch next to you. Alright, let's get into it.

Voice and Audio
Now that you have a grasp on the first three building blocks of mixed reality experiences, namely gaze, gesture, and spatial mapping, it is time to cover the last two. Although we now have an app that is functional, and you can interact with holograms in a real physical environment, or an emulated one at least, it still isn't a complete mixed reality experience. We need to add another two components to draw users in and make the app completely immersive. First up, we explore adding voice features to the app. You will learn how to design effective voice commands that aren't difficult or confusing. You'll learn about the already existing voice features out of the box, and then we will of course implement some voice commands for our app. You'll see how simple voice commands are to implement and what to watch out for as well. Second, you'll be adding some sound to your holograms to make a more immersive experience, but also guide users and help them use your app more effectively. As with voice, sound design is crucial and difficult to get right. You will learn industry-best practices on creating sound for holograms and ambient sounds as well. Spatial audio is a very important part of any mixed reality experience and we will go through how to make it successful. We'll also delve into how the head-related transfer function is used to make audio spatial and believable. Finally, we create some sound design and implement it in our app and have a look at how our finished app looks and works, so let's go!

Testing and Deploying Your App
Our mixed reality app for the HoloLens is now complete, or at least the development of features is complete. We've added in five main pillars of a mixed reality experience being gaze, gestures, spatial mapping, voice, and audio. The final steps in the initial lifecycle of the app is to test it, to make sure that there aren't any bugs hiding somewhere. These could be bugs in code, but also bugs, or omissions, in the design. Testing will include testing the code, the environment, input from the user, telemetry, and perception simulation. Once we're satisfied that that the app has passed our testing, we then conclude the development of the first release. Finally, in order for users to have the pleasure of knocking some big blocks over with an infinite amount of floaty balls, we of course have to publish the app. Publishing a HoloLens app is very similar to publishing any other Windows 10 app. But there are a couple little differences to be aware of. We will look at packaging the app and then submitting it to the store.