Illustrator CC Creating a Poster

This course teaches new designers and non-designers alike how to make a poster in Adobe Illustrator. You’ll learn how to plan your poster, to use design principles to translate your content into a layout, and to output your poster.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Aug 29, 2018
Duration
2h 17m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Aug 29, 2018
Duration
2h 17m
Description

Have you ever needed to make a poster but as a new designer or non-designer, you weren’t sure how? By the end of this course, Illustrator CC Creating a Poster, you’ll be able to not only create a poster, you’ll be able to choose the best output and display options. First, you’ll discover tools to help you plan your poster. Next, you’ll learn about design principles and how to use them to craft a layout that delivers your message to your target audience. Finally, you’ll prepare your poster for printing or displaying as digital signage. When you’re finished with this Illustrator CC course, you will be able to make a poster and will understand how to apply the same planning approach, use of design principles, and output techniques to your other creative projects. Software required: Illustrator CC.

About the author
About the author

Myra Ferguson produces digital media training and experiences as an author and freelance multimedia designer/developer. As an Adobe Community Professional and Adobe User Group Manager, Myra enjoys sharing innovative digital media tips and tricks with the Adobe Community.

Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi, I'm Myra Ferguson, and welcome to my course, Illustrator CC Creating a Poster. I'm an author for Digital Media Training, a freelance multimedia designer/developer and an Adobe Community Professional. This course takes you through the process of making a poster with Illustrator CC. If you're new to design or wouldn't even consider yourself a designer and you need to create a poster, I've made this course especially for you. In this course, we're going to look at planning your poster, including using a creative brief; design principles that help you translate your content into a layout; tips that'll help you improve the quality of your poster; and outputting your poster to share, print in-house, print commercially, or display as digital signage. By the end of this course, you'll be able to create a poster in Illustrator with some tools and some tricks to make it easier to get your message to your audience. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with some basics of using Illustrator. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn how to plan, design, and output a poster using Illustrator with the Illustrator CC Creating a Poster course, at Pluralsight.

Getting Started
Hi, I'm Myra Ferguson. If you're someone who needs to create a poster but don't have a lot of fundamental design background or technical skill, then this course is for you. You'll learn key design principles and techniques using Illustrator to help you make a great-looking poster that communicates your message and targets your goals. Before you watch this course, you should have a basic understanding of Illustrator drawing and text tools. If you need some help getting up to speed with the tools in Illustrator, I'd recommend first watching Illustrator CC Fundamentals by Matthew Pizzi and Illustrator CC Simple Designs by Laura Coyle. In this course, you'll learn how to get started by making a creative brief, learning what information to include on your poster, determining what kind of poster best fits your needs, and finding inspiration and assets. I'll show you design principles that help you make better choices for your layout, colors, and type. We'll walk through the process of translating your message into a layout by identifying a main idea, determining relevant creative, thinking organizationally, double checking your working, and iterating. Discover sources for assets and type that you can incorporate into your poster and see how to address the top considerations of non-designers and new designers, including exercising restraint and production concerns, such as printing to the edge, which is known as a bleed, and saving money with techniques that can help you use fewer colors. Finally, you'll learn how to prepare your poster for distribution, either for printing in-house or through a service bureau, or for displaying as digital signage.

Highlighting Poster-relevant Design Principles
In the last module, we took a look at ways to get started by preparing a creative brief to organize our project and set our goal using the five Ws and H to make sure the pertinent information gets included, identifying categories of posters for ideas based on established conventions and finding inspiration and assets with Adobe Stock artwork and templates. In this module, I'll give you a crash course in design principles that directly relate to ways to make your poster. You'll get an overview of applying composition concepts to your poster, employing color to convey ideas and create mood, and harnessing typography by making smart font choices that are appropriate for your content and that influence ideas through the characteristics of their design. You'll be able to refer back to this module as a sort of visual dictionary of design principles when making your poster.

Using Design Principles to Translate Your Message into a Layout
The last module was a crash course in design principles to get you familiar with the tools you can use to craft your poster. We looked at composition concepts to understand the effect of the placement of elements. We went over color basics with examples of color schemes and how to use color to elicit particular responses, and we did an overview of Illustrator font classes for a guideline of which fonts work well with certain uses and for evoking certain feelings. Now that we have an idea of what we'd like our poster to do, the information that should be included, and an understanding of design principles that can help us convey our message, let's turn our message into a poster layout. We're going to refine our message by identifying a main idea. We'll take that idea and use it to think about our design to determine relevant creative. If you don't consider yourself creative, don't worry; we'll look at what you can do to take an analytical approach to making your poster by thinking about organization. After our layout is done, we'll go over what to do to double-check it. If we're missing information or if some part of the layout doesn't seem to be working, we'll look at the process of iterating.

Incorporating Assets into Your Poster
We just finished up a pass at putting together our layout. When we were double-checking our poster, we noted some changes to make in the next iteration pertaining to art and typography. Making your own artwork or font is the best way to avoid copyright issues or licensing fees, but if you don't have the skill yet or the time, knowing where to get assets that'll work will save you the effort. In this module, we'll talk about acquiring and modifying artwork and obtaining and manipulating fonts. After watching, you'll be able to find free resources for stock art, work with preview images from a professional stock art site, use Illustrator's Image Trace to clean up a low-resolution logo, find out how to use Adobe Typekit to get fonts, use Google Fonts to get even more fonts, and learn simple ways to manipulate text for your poster.

Tips for Typical Posters
Our poster layout is finished, but what do you do if you get to this point and you don't really like how it looks? It isn't printing correctly from your printer or you find out you need to cut the cost? When you do this next round of double-checks, you can look at specific areas where you can improve your poster design and prepare for its production. In this module, I'll give you some tips to help you improve the quality of your poster, exercise some restraint in the design to make it look more professional, get that printed-to-the-edge look, and reduce the number of colors for commercially printed pieces. Use these tips to be prepared for the top considerations non-designers and new designers have when making a poster. Knowing these tips can help you save some money and hopefully some stress when you're about to output your poster.

Poster Output
Your poster is now ready for its big debut, but just like there are numerous types of posters, there are lots of different types of output. The output type, or types since you could display your poster or parts of it in multiple ways, may depend on what resources you have available and how you're trying to reach your audience. In this module, we'll look at the steps involved in sharing your work, printing your poster in-house, printing your poster commercially, and displaying your poster as digital signage. I'll explain how to prepare your poster for these types of output with some additional information to help you be prepared for various scenarios and to give you some suggestions for accomplishing your output goals.