Improve N1QL Query Performance Using Indexes

This course covers the different kinds of indexes available in Couchbase to help speed up the execution of N1QL queries. The course includes a combination of concepts and labs to demonstrate the creation of indexes and their use in N1QL queries.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Mar 10, 2020
Duration
4h 26m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Getting Started with Indexes
Creating Secondary Indexes in Couchbase
Building Complex Secondary Indexes
Implementing Different Types of Indexes
Understanding Factors That Affect Query Performance
Distributing Query Execution Loads with Pushdowns
Optimizing Query Execution
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Mar 10, 2020
Duration
4h 26m
Description

Indexes are a very interesting feature in any database, and this is also true of Couchbase. In this course, Improve N1QL Query Performance Using Indexes, you will cover the various kinds of indexes you can create and what kind of N1QL queries they can help with in terms of speeding up their execution.

First, you will begin by exploring the most basic kinds of indexes which are known as primary indexes. Next, you will look at secondary indexes containing just a single field and how one or more of them can be used by a N1QL query to improve performance. Then, you will move on to composite indexes containing multiple fields and discuss their benefits and limitations. Finally, you will glimpse the Analytics Service in Couchbase which allows you to run queries against the data in a bucket by splitting them up into datasets of similar documents.

Once you are done with this course, you will be quite the expert in the different kinds of indexes available in Couchbase, and how they can be applied to improve the performance of your N1QL queries.

About the author
About the author

An engineer at heart, I am drawn to any interesting technical topic. Big Data, ML and Cloud are presently my topics of interest.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi, and welcome to this course, Improve N1QL Query Performance Using Indexes. My name is Kishan Iyer, and I will be your instructor for this course. A little about myself first. I have a Master's Degree in computer science from Columbia University and have previously worked in companies such as Deutsche Bank and WebMD in New York. Right now, I work for Loonycorn, a studio for high‑quality video content. Indexes are a very interesting feature in any database, and this also applies to Couchbase. In this course, we cover the different kinds of indexes you can create and the types of N1QL queries they can help with in terms of speeding up their execution. We begin by exploring the most basic kind of indexes, which are known as primary indexes. The remainder of the course then focuses on one other kind of index, which in Couchbase comes in various flavors, namely the secondary index. At first, we look at secondary indexes containing just a single field and how one or more of them can be used by a single N1QL query. We then move on to composite indexes, which contain multiple fields, and then discuss their benefits, as well as limitations. We then explore more advanced indexes, such as adaptive indexes and partitioned indexes. And we'll also explore concepts such as covering indexes and pushdowns. We also use the Couchbase advise feature to get recommendations on indexes, which can be generated for a query. Finally, we get a glimpse of the analytics service in Couchbase, which allows us to run queries against the data in a bucket by splitting them up into datasets of similar documents. Once you're done with this course, you will be quite the expert in the different kinds of indexes available in Couchbase and how they can be applied to improve the performance of your N1QL queries.