Introduction to modo

Easily learn modo and a creative workflow to modeling, sculpting, painting, animating, and rendering using fun projects. Contains over 7 hours of project-based training for artists new to modo and its powerful capabilities. Perfect for new and beginning artists. Popular highlights include: Interface Overview; Customizing the Interface; Navigating 3D Viewport; Modeling Tools; Mesh Sculpting; Image-based Sculpting; Slicing Geometry; Smoothing Meshes; Combining Geometry; Setting Keyframes; Editing keyframes with Graph Editor; Blending Texture Layers; Utilizing Materials; Light Setup; Global Illumination; Subsurface Scattering; Adjusting Render Settings; Rendering Multiple Passes; Cloning Meshes; Working With Mesh Items; Bevel Tool; 3D Painting; Texture Layers for Effects; UV Layout; Morph Maps; Creating Images Inside modo; Using Solid Sketch.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jan 21, 2008
Duration
7h 45m
Table of contents
Introduction and Project Overview
Introduction to MODO
Navigating the Interface 7m Using the Help System 5m Working with Scene Files 6m Setting Scene Preferences 6m Organizing Scene Items 9m Getting Information About Your Scene 7m Changing View Port Layouts 6m Customizing the Interface 12m Using the Workplane 5m Working with Tools and the Tool Pipe 6m Geometry Essentials - Working with Subdivision Surfaces 10m Changing Settings for Displaying Geometry 8m Working with Selections 10m Creating Primitive Geometry 8m Using the Pen Tool and Solid Sketch 12m Modeling with Curves 11m Options for Transforming Geometry 11m Transforming Elements 10m Using Falloffs to Modify Tools 8m Using Deformers 8m Options for Smoothing Geometry 4m Modifying Subdivision Edges 5m Slicing Geometry 10m Using Tools to Add Geometry 12m Combining and Merging Geometry 8m Removing and Flipping Polygons 4m Duplicating Mesh Items 9m Cloning Geometry 9m Using Arrays to Create Large Groups 6m Using Mesh Paint to Place Geometry 6m Essentials of UV Layout 5m Using Different UV Projection Methods 7m Using Unwrap and UV Peeler to Layout UVs 7m Manipulating the UV Layout 7m Essentials of Sculpting 5m Using the Sculpting Tools 8m Combining Sculpting Tools with Brushes 7m Using Image-based Sculpting 12m Texture Mapping Essentials 7m Changing Material Settings 10m Adding Layers in the Shader Tree 6m Piping Layers into Different Texture Effects 7m Blending Layers in the Shader Tree 9m Using the Paint Tools 13m Combining Brushes with the Paint Tools 10m Using Image Ink to Paint Geometry 6m Animation Essentials 4m Changing Animation Settings 6m Setting Key Frames 6m Editing Key Frames in the Graph Editor 7m Essentials of Rendering 8m Changing Render Settings 7m Changing Environment Settings 5m Using Cameras 8m Adding and Modifying Lights 8m Lighting with Luminous Polygons 4m Using Global Illumination and HDR(High Dynamic Range) 6m Adding Backdrops 4m Adding New Render Outputs 5m Rendering Animation / Turntables 7m
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jan 21, 2008
Duration
7h 45m
Description

Easily learn modo and a creative workflow to modeling, sculpting, painting, animating, and rendering using fun projects. Contains over 7 hours of project-based training for artists new to modo and its powerful capabilities. Perfect for new and beginning artists. Popular highlights include: Interface Overview; Customizing the Interface; Navigating 3D Viewport; Modeling Tools; Mesh Sculpting; Image-based Sculpting; Slicing Geometry; Smoothing Meshes; Combining Geometry; Setting Keyframes; Editing keyframes with Graph Editor; Blending Texture Layers; Utilizing Materials; Light Setup; Global Illumination; Subsurface Scattering; Adjusting Render Settings; Rendering Multiple Passes; Cloning Meshes; Working With Mesh Items; Bevel Tool; 3D Painting; Texture Layers for Effects; UV Layout; Morph Maps; Creating Images Inside modo; Using Solid Sketch.

About the author
About the author

Justin thrives as a lead modeling author at Pluralsight. Growing up, Justin found a deep interest for the computer graphics industry after watching movies like Jurassic Park, Toy Story and The Abyss. His ambition would lead him to work at Sony Imageworks in Los Angeles on movies like Monster House and Surf's Up. Justin has also had numerous articles, tutorials and images published in 3D World and 3D Artist.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
Hello, and welcome to Introduction to Modo, presented by Digital Tutors. My name is Justin and I'll be your instructor as we explore the various aspects of the software that you'll need to know in order to begin producing artwork in Modo. Modeling, sculpting, painting, and texturing, rendering, all of these disciplines are involved in creating a piece of 3D artwork. Now, often times, in order to accomplish all this work, it will need to be spread among multiple applications. With Modo, however, much of this work can be done without ever leaving the software. Using Modo's integrated solutions, you're able to build your models, sculpt them, paint and texture them, and finally, render your completed image. But because of the scope of the software, the flexibility of the tools, and the customization options that the interface provides, it can be a little bit tricky to learn. Even if you're familiar with 3D concepts or used another package, many of the methods will still seem a bit foreign at first, and it's important to understand the basics, you know, where things are and what things do. Our goal for this training isn't necessarily going to be to look at each and every tool and setting. We'll have plenty of time for that as you get comfortable with Modo, and find the interface, and workflow that works best for you. What we can do, however, is give you a start to finish overview of the software so that you can be productive using Modo as soon as possible. Now, before we begin, I want to take a second and talk about the project files. You can find the models we'll be using in the Scenes directory of your project files, on the CD. The textures in the Textures directory, and so on. Now, a few of the lessons will have specific starting points, and those project files will be named with the number of the lesson, but for many of the other lessons, you can actually use any of the asset files that we've provided, and they'll also be located in the scenes directory. Now, these assets include a variety of items in keeping with a board game motif. As this is meant as an introduction, our end results will not be quite as important as in some of our other training. So, feel free to use the asset provided or experiment on your own and have some fun. All right, let's begin by getting our bearings within Modo by looking at the different sections of Modo's interface. All right, so, when you first start up Modo, you're going to get something like this, this is, we're working in 301. So, this is the, basically, the default layout of these different sections here for Modo. So, let's take a look at some of these items. Now, I want to begin by saying our real, screen real estate here is going to be a little bit tight, so, some of the things are going to be squeezed together. For instance, I've got this little arrow here, you're going to have, probably, this whole row of items up here. You can see that if I pull this out, they start to show up. But just so that we can see everything, it's kind of going to be a little bit squished, but we'll get the idea. So, let's take a look at where the different sections of this interface and what they do. So, the first thing we want to look at is you can see that there's a typical menu up here at the top that you will see in almost every piece of software. And a lot of times, it's easy to forget this is up here with everything, all the things that we can do down here. But a lot of times, if you don't find something, a tool, or an action that you're going to perform, you're going to be able to look up here. So, we've got the typical file actions here, we can save and load images. Things like that, we've got edit. Symmetry, and the transforms, and things like this. If you select, you've got all of these different items up here that you can go through in a typical menu fashion, they can drop down, and select whatever you want to do, kay? So, you've got the menu up here on top. Let's go ahead and look over here on the side here. This side is going to be dedicated to your different tools, kay? So, when you're modeling a painting, sculpting, your tools are going to be located over here. If we go up to the, you can see that there's a couple of tabs here. The first tab is tools, kay? And on that tab, you're going to have basic, which is going to have, you know, your primitives, and some transforms, some of these actions that you're going to want to do down here. If we continue down here, you can see there's a whole list. We've got basic, we've got deformations if we want to accomplish those, we've got all of these buttons over here. Duplicating geometry gives us a whole other array of tools. Mesh edit, so, you can see you can go down and select all of these different tools. Now, in this section up here is where you're going to select your tools. When you actually select a tool, you're going to see that the properties for that tool appear down below. Okay, we have the tool properties set up to be in this view port right here. And all of these different sections here, you can refer to them as view ports. And we'll talk a little bit later about the amount of customization that you can do within Modo, but basically, any of these view ports, any of these little sections can be really anything that you want them to be. But right now, we're talking about the default layout, which is what you're going to be probably starting with. And when you're beginning to learn Modo, you're probably going to want to stay within that. Give or take a little bit, though. So, your tool properties are going to be down here. It's going to give you the options, whatever options exist for that tool. You're going to be able to change those down here. Okay? All right, so, we've got the tools, and then we can also go to sculpt and paint, which will give us the options for sculpting, you can see we've got sculpting tools, and then our brushes down here. Our nozzles and our image ink. We've also got the paint tools. Okay, so these are going to be your paint tools, and then you can combine those with the brushes down here. And again, any time you activate any of these, you're going to see that you're going to have your tool properties that you can change right below there. Okay? We've also got the utilities, where we're able to actually create textures and things like that. So, these are all located in the sculpt paint tab, and then we've got the tool tab, okay? So, these are both going to be very important in actually creating our geometry. Okay, so these are going to be located over here. Now, as we move over to the right, the center section is where we're actually going to be looking at our geometry that we're going to be working with. So, you can see we've got a single 3D view port here. Located in this large area. And above this, we've got the, we've got a couple things. We've got the tabs here for the different layouts. So, you can see right now, I'm just in model layout, which, all of these are going to correspond to the center area here. So, if I want to do the model layout. We've also got a lot of these presets here, so, I can choose to go to model quad, which gives us your typical top, front, right perspective views, okay? You can also change that to a paint sort of layout here, which gives us an image browser, and a color picker, and just sets it up so that you're able to paint on this. So, it's kind of customized for whatever action you're doing. We've got a UV here, so we can work, see our 3D model over here, and then see the UV, the UV grid over here, zero to one space right there. And you can see that I haven't changed any of my tools. And if I wanted to work on UVs, I could go in here and change that to UV. And then I've got all my UV tools there in the UV layout. I've also got an animate, which gives us our time slider and all of these key framing items down here. And also, render try, which gives us a preview window right here, and we've got a camera that we can position, so, this is basically the same view as looking through this preview, and this, we would enable us to kind of move around and get the shot composed the way that we want to. And then down here, we have just the perspective view, which you can see, you can move around, it's not affecting the preview or this camera. You can actually see the lights, and the cameras, and you can manually come in here and move these around to create this shot. So, this is basically a preview of what you will be rendering when you actually do render. So, we've got all of these different tabs here that we can go through, depending on what action we're going to be doing, or what, if we're going to be modeling, texturing, painting, we may want to use some of these different layouts up here. All right, and this, just like I said, just applies. It's not really a global layout as far as the entire interface, it just applies here to the middle. Now, as we move down, you'll see that we've got these buttons up here, vertices, edges, and polygons, and items, okay? So, an item, now, we'll talk about this a little bit later, but these are just going to allow you to kind of go, if you're familiar with another, any other 3D packages, we've got sort of a, like, an object mode, and a component mode, or just the ability to select the object as a whole. And then the ability to go in and select the different pieces, in Modo, the object as a whole is referred to as an item, okay? And then we've got the different pieces of the objects and polygons, sometimes referred to as faces in other programs, are going to be, well, just the actual faces there, and then we've got edges and vertices. And we can click on these, and that will just put us into our different selection modes. Okay, and we'll go into greater depth on using these a little bit later. Next, these four buttons, and if I click on this arrow, yours are probably already up there, you can see I've also got the ability to change the action center, we've got symmetry settings, follow settings, snapping settings, work point. All of these, we're able to combine with the different tools to change how they behave. So, we've got action centers to change sort of where we're rotating or translating from. We've got symmetry settings, whether we can sort of mirror our work to which axis we want to change that. We'll look at all these again later, but those are some of the settings that are located up here on top. Now, as we move again over to the right, again, we've got another sort of tabbed view port here. Now, up at the top, this is sort of where we're organizing our, the items in our scene, okay? And this is going to be called the item list, all right? So, you can see at the top level of our item list, we've got the scene name, okay? With the little slate icon over there. This is going to be the name of our scene. Okay, and then we've got different items in here. Okay, we've got a camera, we've got a texture item, we've got a light, we've got the actual geometry in a group here, okay? So, all these different items in here, and you can see that their visibilities are, you're able to change those over here on this side. Right? So, this is where we're going to be organizing our actual pieces of geometry, as well as things like cameras, and lights, and things like this. You can click down here and create new items. And also create new scenes. So, this is going to be your item list, which you're going to be using a lot. Another thing you're going to be using a lot is going to be the tab right next to the item list, and that is the Shader Tree, okay? So, if I click on that tab, you can see that this is going to give us our materials, our render outputs, our environment settings, our light settings, things like that that we're going to be concerned about. So, this is where we're going to actually be adding image maps to our materials, where we're going to be combining and blending different image maps and different procedural effects together with our materials. So, this is where all of the look of the texturing and things like that are going to take place here, in our Shader Tree, okay? That's going to be right next to your item list. So, you're going to be using these a lot. And I know a lot of people customize their interfaces accordingly, some of them like to have that available at all times, so, they'll move it to a different location. But, right next to our Shader Tree is going to be the images, and this is just going to be a sort of a bin where we're going to keep all of our images that we have loaded in. So, you can see I've got one loaded in already. You can load in another image or actually create new images within this software, which is really neat. But any time you want to look at your images, you can come in here, you can see it'll tell you the resolution, the format, et cetera, so, this is good to know where this is. And right next to images, you're going to find the quick tips, so, you're going to find a few different little items in here, and you click on these, it'll bring up a web browser with options to go in and explore some of those ideas in a little bit greater depth. So, it's really neat, okay? So, as we move down from the item list, and the Shader Tree, and the images, you'll see down here we have a few more tabs. So, the first tab we're going to look at is the list, okay? So, we can see if I click on this, it's going to bring up these, a view port right here, and these sections in these view ports. The first one is going to be our maps list. So, we're going to be able to organize all of our UV maps, our morph maps, all the different kind of maps that we would create, which, we would think of probably not as much as image maps, but sort of data maps. Our UV maps would be our, like, our UV layout, where the UV layout is stored. Morph maps would be where we would store sculpted information into those UV maps, and we can access those maps here in this view port. Down below this is going to be our tool pipeline, and the tool pipeline is going to be something that's maybe a little bit different, maybe take a little bit of getting used to, but it's a very important part of Modo, and that is the fact that you can combine tools with different effects for those tools, and you can see how those are combined in the tool pipe. And we'll talk more about the tool pipeline and how it works later. But that's what this is, and we've got presets over here. And so, when you activate tools, you can see that you're going to be able to see the tools, and you'll see all the different things that are currently in the tool pipe that are affecting how that tool behaves, okay? Now, below the tool pipe, you'll find... An info and statistics. And this is going to be a view port that's going to give you information about your scene, about your polygons, your edges, your vertices, it's going to be really useful in finding, you can sort polygons by number of vertices, so forth, and be able to get a lot of information out of your scene. Now, all the way at the bottom, you can see as I move these up, they're kind of squishing together, they're kind of trying to keep as much information as there, in there as they can while still being the same size, so, you can see that information will change as I squish those and pull those apart. But the last one down here is going to be the command history. That's going to give you an idea of basically what has happened, your undos, your history of the tools that you've used, and so forth. And you're able to come in here and look at some of these things, and also change the undos. You can drag up here to change the undos, and we'll talk a little about some more of these pieces later, okay? So, this is the, like I said, the default layout, and we want to kind of stick with the default layout just so that we're all on the same page. But the ability to customize Modo is one of its strengths. And we'll look at how to actually customize that, the interface, a little bit later. In the next lesson, I'm actually going to look at how we can navigate the interface. So, we'll look at how we can move around within the 3D view port, some of the hot keys to bring up our navigation options, we'll look at how we can change our views, and look at changing some of the methods of rotation, and the methods that we can navigate around within the interface, okay? So, we'll continue looking at the interface in the next lesson.