Introduction to Modeling in 3ds Max 2009

Learn a fundamental workflow to Polygon, NURBS, and Splined-based modeling and time-saving techniques to creatively utilizing the robust tools available in 3ds Max. Software required: 3ds Max 2009 and up (required to open project files).
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Oct 6, 2008
Duration
4h 10m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Oct 6, 2008
Duration
4h 10m
Description

Learn a fundamental workflow to Polygon, NURBS, and Splined-based modeling and time-saving techniques to creatively utilizing the robust tools available in 3ds Max. Contains nearly 4 hours of self-paced training for artists new to modeling in 3ds Max and experienced artists seeking a refresher. Popular highlights include: NURBS Workflow; Polygon Workflow; Splines and Patches Workflow; Scene Organization with Layers; Smoothing Methods; Working with Sub-objects; Sub-object Selection Methods; Adding Viewport Background Images; Scale Deformation; Cloning Geometry and Shapes; Mirroring Geometry; Sweep Modifier; Shell Modifier; Symmetry Modifier; Surface Modifier; FFD Modifiers; Lathe Modifier; Modifier Stack; Moving Pivot Points; Transforming Geometry and Shapes; Modifying Creation Parameters; Creating Booleans; Attaching and Detaching Objects; Welding Vertices; Rendering and Viewing Curves; HSDS Modifier for Subdivision Surfaces. Software required: 3ds Max 2009 and up (required to open project files).

About the author
About the author

Justin thrives as a lead modeling author at Pluralsight. Growing up, Justin found a deep interest for the computer graphics industry after watching movies like Jurassic Park, Toy Story and The Abyss. His ambition would lead him to work at Sony Imageworks in Los Angeles on movies like Monster House and Surf's Up. Justin has also had numerous articles, tutorials and images published in 3D World and 3D Artist.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
[Autogenerated] Hi and welcome to introduction to Modeling in three D. S. Max, presented by digital tutors and Autodesk Authorized Publisher. My name is Justin and I'll be your instructor as we explore some of the basic tools and techniques that you want to know in order to start modeling. In three years, Max the 30 s Max has been the tool of choice for many three yards for quite some time. One of the advantages max offers to users is its robust modeling tool set. So whether you're starting fresh with three D, coming to max from another application or just trying to broaden your max skill set learning some of the modeling methods available to you will be very important. We will begin by talking about the different types of geometry that we can create. In three years. Max, from polygons to nerves, patches and subdivision surfaces and then using a wide array of modelling tools, will build a Swiss army knife. Now this model will give us the opportunity to use different modeling tools and techniques as well as methods for ensuring that everything fits together nicely. Will also explore various workflow and seen maintenance issues. We won't be able to cover every tool, but the tools that you learn will provide a great springboard from which you can continue your max education. So let's get started by taking a look at some of the different types of geometry that you can work with when working in three D. S. Max. One of the most popular types of geometry that you'll be working with is polygon geometry. This type of geometry will allow you to build complex objects with completely custom topology. Let's take a look at what constitutes a polygon and then how we can include political geometry into our scene. So before we look at how we can actually build polygons and we're seeing, let's take a look at some of the pieces that make up a polygon object right here we just have a simple cube drawn into our view port, and we're gonna go to our modified panel to access this And if we drop down under editable mesh will find the different sub objects that were able to access. Okay, these are the little pieces that actually make up this piece of political geometry that we can rotate around. The first thing that we're gonna look at for sub object is the Vertex. The vertex is seen here as a little blue dot and this is kind of the building block of our three d piece of geometry is basically a point in space defined by coordinates and X, y and Z and our three view port. I can see that we have one here, here, all the corners, basically all these intersections. Now these vortices are connected by edges. Okay, you can see that we're accessing our edges here. And these air simply lines that are connecting all the different verses together. Okay, Now these edges are connected and the geometry between is called either face or polygon. In this case of face is going to represent the strangulated piece of this face, which is kind of the basic building block of our three D geometry. Okay, As you can see, I can access the different triangles and in this case, the triangulated edges are not being shown. Okay, which is polygon. It will select the entire quad face for the entire foresighted piece of geometry. So you can think of a face is kind of the basic three d building block and then polygon to be sort of a group of faces. Okay, Element will allow you to choose the entire element as polygons. Okay, now, depending on if you have this as an edible mash or edible Polly, you may not have access to the actual faces. I can see that. If I right, click on this and go down to convert to editable Polly and open this up, you can see I don't have access to faces any longer. Simply have access to the polygon. So that's just something to be able to be aware of. All right, now, how do I actually get some political geometry into my scene? Go ahead and just delete this. Actually add geometry to your scene, you're gonna go to the create panel and you're gonna find our political geometry andr, geometry, standard primitives is a good place to start. Now, there are other ways to actually build geometry. Several of the construction methods that will be looking at throughout the course of this training will allow you to build your objects in polygons. But this is just probably the quickest way to start bringin, supplicant, all geometry so we can start just by bringing in, Let's say, a cylinder. Okay, we have parameters down here that we can change what we can simply drag out in the view port. The initial drag when we're holding down our left mouse button, Well, they to drag out the radius, let off the button and then pull up in that relate to set the height. All right, go ahead, Cue to go to selection, and then we'll go to modify. And there you can see our parameters that we're able to change. I can change the height segments. I can change the cap segments, but you'll see that I can't really access any of the sub objects that we talked about. I can't access the Vergis ease or the edges, or in fact, even the polygons or faces. And that's because we still have this sort of creation history on here. Okay, and you can see that there's no for dropped down to be able to access any subjects whatsoever. So to be able to access our subjects, there are a few things that we need to be able to do. One thing that we can do is to actually at a modifier. So in this case, we can add either an edit mesh modifier or an edit Polly modifier to the top of the stack. And this will allow us to actually come in and select these different so objects cm selecting the vergis ese. I can select edges as well and also polygons. The nice thing about using this as a modifier is that we can turn this off. We can go back and access our creation parameters if we'd like to do that. And we can always throw that away if we don't like it. Okay, If you don't need your creation parameters anymore, you can also just convert this to an editable Polly and don't need to do this any time. We're going to be connecting different pieces together. Doing any sort of extrusion is any kind of work you're going to be doing on the subject level. You need to have this either converted to inevitable Polly or with some kind of an edit Polly or edit fish modifier above it in the stack. So go ahead and right click on this object go to convert to, and I'll convert it to editable Polly. Okay, against he see here that that name has changed and now just says editable Polly. And you can see I can now access all of my different subjects. Okay, Now, when you have your edible polly selected depending on which a subject you select, you'll get different options here in our rollout as to what kind of tools you can use on those particular sub objects. And we'll look at how we can use some of those in a later lesson. Okay, One of the things to remember about using polygons is the fact that we can extrude out these faces. We can make some very complex shapes. The thing is, if we want something that's very smooth, we need to use a lot of polygons. You can see that we have quite a few polygons around this radius, but looking at this, you can see how it's very jagged. Okay, so the only way to smooth this out is actually add more polygons if we're going to stay with using our political geometry. So to do this, we can either use smooth down here, go and smooth that out. You can see as more polygons. We can also add a modifier, perhaps a turbo smooth bump up the generations and you can see that this gets much smoother. But as it does, we add many, many more polygons to the mix. So if we were now ready to come in and we've got this all smoothed out, let's say we collapsed this into an editable mash. And now I want to go in and modify this. You can see that I have a lot more polygons, A lot more vergis is to worry about. So this may be something that you want to do at the end, and maybe something you want to keep in mind. If the object that you're creating needs to be very smooth, you're going to have issues when you start to smooth that out as far as getting many more polygons included into your interior polygon. So that's just something to be aware of. You're able to get very custom geometry. Very custom Topology can make some very complex shapes, but the downside is anywhere you need to be very smooth. You're going tohave to either add a lot of geometry, a lot of polygons or you're going to need to use some other type of geometry. All right, so it's kind of a quick overview of polygons. Next, let's go ahead and talk about another of three D S. Max's geometry types. This one is going to be nerves, so we'll talk about how we can use nerves geometry in the next lesson.