What's New in Java EE 8

Learn about the new features introduced with Java EE 8, such as an all-new Security API, JSON-B for binding Java objects to JSON, and many improved versions of existing Java EE technologies.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 30, 2018
Duration
1h 59m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 30, 2018
Duration
1h 59m
Description

There are many new features Java EE 8. In this course, What's New in Java EE 8, you'll learn about Java's completely new Security API, improving upon the hard-to-use and often container-specific security mechanisms. First, you'll discover the brand-new JSON-B, an API for binding Java objects to JSON, and vice versa. With very little code, you'll explore how you can generate and consume JSON without any third-party libraries. Besides new technologies, many existing Java EE technologies got updated with Java EE 8 as well. Servlet 4.0, for example, now supports HTTP/2 and Server Push. JAX-RS 2.1, the technology for RESTful endpoints in Java EE, now also implements the Server-sent Events web standard. Additionally, you'll see all major updates to Java EE technologies in this release such as JPA 2.2, CDI 2.0 and JSF 2.3. Finally, you'll learn about the future of Java EE. Oracle is moving Java EE to an open-source foundation, which means the future of Java EE will be more open, and at the same time maybe less predictable. By the end of this course, you'll be ready to explore and use Java EE 8 all on your own.

About the author
About the author

Sander is a Fellow at Luminis in The Netherlands, where he crafts modular and scalable software, most often on the JVM, but with a touch of TypeScript when needed. He also is a Java Champion and author of the O'Reilly book 'Java 9 Modularity' (see javamodularity.com). As an avid conference speaker, Sander loves sharing knowledge, also through his blog at http://branchandbound.net and as Pluralsight instructor.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Sander Mak, and welcome to my course, What's New in Java EE 8. I'm a fellow and software architect at Luminis in the Netherlands and author the O'Reilly book Java 9 Modularity. Do you know that Java EE 8 is the last release of Java EE by Oracle? Don't worry, this doesn't mean the end of Java EE, but rather a new beginning of Java EE development within the open source community. In this course, you'll learn about this new future of Java EE. Java EE 8 itself has two completely new APIs to the platform, and updates many other technologies. We'll look at the new JSON-B API for serializing Java objects to JSON and back. Also, we'll see how the new security API in Java EE 8 replaces some very old and brittle mechanisms that were based on container-specific configuration. Now, we get an easy to use portable API. Besides new APIs, existing Java EE 8 technologies also got new features. Servlets, for example, now support HTTP/2, including the server push feature. The JSF web framework gained native support for WebSocket communication. JAX-RS, the technology for building RESTful endpoints with Java EE now supports the server-sent events web standards. With server-sent events, it becomes easy to continuously push updates to clients. Also, JAX-RS gets improved support for asynchronous request handling. Through this course, you'll get an overview of all updated and new APIs in Java EE 8. This course assumes you have experience writing applications using earlier versions of Java EE. Technologies like servlets and JAX-RS should already be familiar to you. After finishing this course, you should feel comfortable using Java EE 8 as an enterprise development platform. I hope you'll join me on this journey to get up to speed with the latest and greatest developments in Java EE with the What's New in Java EE 8 course here at Pluralsight.