Getting Started With Java EE on WebSphere® Application Server

This course introduces you to WebSphere® Application Server and provides you everything you need to get started.
Course info
Rating
(121)
Level
Beginner
Updated
May 7, 2015
Duration
2h 54m
Table of contents
Installing WebSphere® Application Server and Eclipse
WebSphere® Application Server Tour for Developers
Creating a New Enterprise Application and Web Application
Creating a Data Source and Building the Data Access Layer
Building a Web UI With JavaServer Faces
Creating a Web Service Interface (JAX-WS and JAX-RS)
Description
Course info
Rating
(121)
Level
Beginner
Updated
May 7, 2015
Duration
2h 54m
Description

This course introduces web developers (with or without Java EE experience) to Java EE development leveraging WebSphere® Application Server. You will first be guided through installing and configuring WebSphere® Application Server, as well as integrating Eclipse. With everything set up, you will be taken through configuring a data source and developing an entire enterprise application from backend, to web front end, to web services.

About the author
About the author

Craig St. Jean is a Software Architect with a passion for designing and writing software. His core competency is Java EE, but he enjoys working with many technologies. Craig also loves sharing his knowledge and experiences with others.

Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Installing WebSphere® Application Server and Eclipse
Hi, this is Craig St. Jean. Welcome to my course Getting Started with Java EE on WebSphere Application Server. WebSphere Application Server is what serves a significant amount of Java EE applications for enterprises, but getting started can sometimes be a challenge. Whether you are taking a fulltime position at a company leveraging WebSphere Application Server, or are a consultant wanting to get started with the technology, this course can give you the foundation you need. In this course, we will set up a local development environment, take a tour through the WebSphere administration console, show how Eclipse, the IDE we will be using, integrates with it, and build an application that leverages data sources, a web UI, and web services. By the end of this course, you should have a foundation built to get started on an existing team, or to further your learning with Java EE and apply that learning to a WebSphere-based environment.

Creating a New Enterprise Application and Web Application
In this module, we'll be creating the components of our list manager application, including the enterprise application project, a backend project, a web-based user interface project, using JSF, or Java Server Faces, and a web services project. By the end of this module, you should understand what enterprise applications are and the difference between a web application and an enterprise application. You will learn how various Java EE projects fit together, and you will learn to create these projects targeted to the WebSphere application server run time.

Creating a Data Source and Building the Data Access Layer
With the list manager projects that we created in the prior module, this module will cover connecting WebSphere to a database and implementing the data access library. To accomplish this, we'll go over the list manager use cases and business process, we will connect our WebSphere application server profile to a PostgreSQL database, and we will implement the data access code business rules and unit tests.

Building a Web UI With JavaServer Faces
Now that we have the list manager back end built and ready to go, we can move forward and build something you can see and work with. In short we are going to make a web application that looks like this: a simple login page, and our list management page. To do this we will leverage Java Server Faces or JSF. We will integrate it with our back end code, and to make things a bit more exciting we will even make our list management page work entirely via Ajax, without writing a single line of JavaScript, but before we write some code, what exactly is Java Server Faces anyway? Simplified, it is a component-based server-side web application specification. Unlike other Java EE web Frameworks, JSF is built into the Java EE specification itself, and because it is only a specification there are multiple implementations of it. Mojarra is Oracle's reference implementation, and MyFaces is Apache's implementation, which is also bundled with WebSphere application server. With that let's dig in and make the web UI for the list manager.

Creating a Web Service Interface (JAX-WS and JAX-RS)
With WebSphere up and configured, and with our list manager back-end and web user interface written, let's have a look at how easy it is to expose our application with web services entirely with functionality provided by WebSphere Application Server. First, we'll use JAX-WS to create SOAP-based web services, then JAX-RS to create REST-based web services.