Java Fundamentals: Object-oriented Design

Simply programming in an OO language does not make your program object oriented. This course teaches you how to leverage essential object-oriented principles to write solid, maintainable code, while avoiding common pitfalls.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jan 20, 2017
Duration
1h 60m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jan 20, 2017
Duration
1h 60m
Description

Simply using an OO language like Java does not make your program object oriented. In fact, when used incorrectly, OO-language features can make your program bloated, overly complex, and impossible to maintain. This course, Java Fundamentals: Object-oriented Design, teaches you how to write effective production-quality OO systems by leveraging the basic principles of good OO design. It assumes you know the nuts and bolts of Java, and goes beyond those to teach you how to write effective, production-quality code in Java, or any other OO language. You will learn how to structure your code to be highly maintainable and easy to modify. You'll learn about the pitfalls of many common idioms (like getters and setters and too-open subclassing). You'll also see the SOLID principles used to solve real-world programming issues as well as see a lot of code that demonstrates the principles. When you're done with the class, you'll have a solid understanding of good OO structure and principles, and be able to apply those principles to your own work.

About the author
About the author

Allen is an internationally recognized trainer, agile-process consultant, speaker, and author. He specializes in Lean/Agile infusion and tuning, software architecture, and web-application programming using open-source toolsets. Allen's worn every hat from grunt programmer to CTO. He's built compilers, operating systems, massively scalable web applications, and mobile apps. He's written a dozen books and hundreds of magazine articles on practical programming topics, and currently blogs for Dr. Dobb's Journal (http://www.drdobbs.com/author/Allen-Holub). Allen speaks regularly at conferences, worldwide, and works for both startups and Fortune-50 companies. Contact him at: [email protected], or on Twitter at @allenholub.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Allen Holub and welcome to my course Object-oriented Design. I have been working with Java pretty much since its inception. I also work as an independent software architect and Agile process consultant and a trainer, and I'm widely published in all of those subjects. Object-oriented programming and object-oriented design are different things. Programming is all about syntax, design is about leveraging basic design principles to write high quality effective code. Without those principles, your program can end up being an un-maintainable mess. Did you know, for example, that getters and setters aren't particularly good structure? Or that you should avoid using extends relationships whenever you can? This course then will teach you how to write industrial-strength object-oriented code. It covers the topics that the language courses and books usually skip. We'll cover essential OO-design principles and good OO structure. We'll look at anti-patterns that can get you into deep trouble. We'll look at all of the so-called SOLID principles in context, and we'll see how to test OO systems effectively. By the end of this course, you'll know how to apply OO principles to write great code. Before beginning this course though, you should know how to read Java, that said, if you know any Java-like language, C++ or C# or Swift, you should have no trouble following along. You should also know a little bit about architectural notation, UML in particular. My companion course, Picturing Architecture, covers that material. From here, you should feel comfortable diving further into design with courses on design patterns and the like. So I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn object-oriented design at Pluralsight.