Java Microservices with Spring Cloud: Coordinating Services

This course will teach you how Spring Cloud makes it easier for you to locate, connect to, protect, and chain your microservices. You'll explore 6 major Spring Cloud projects and how to effectively use them.
Course info
Rating
(49)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 25, 2017
Duration
5h 43m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Introducing Spring Cloud and Microservices Coordination Scenarios
Locating Services at Runtime Using Service Discovery
Protecting Systems with Circuit Breakers
Routing Your Microservices Traffic
Connecting Microservices Through Messaging
Building Data Processing Pipelines Out of Microservices
Description
Course info
Rating
(49)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 25, 2017
Duration
5h 43m
Description

You use microservices because you want a more resilient and adaptable architecture. But with those benefits, comes additional complexity. In this course, Java Microservices with Spring Cloud: Coordinating Services, you'll see how Spring Cloud makes it simple to embed best practices from Netflix and others into your apps. First, you'll interact with a service registry and see how to find services at runtime. After that, you'll find out how to protect your architecture with circuit breakers. Routing and load balancing change in a microservices architecture, and you'll get hands on with Spring Cloud projects that make it easier. Messaging is a powerful way to introduce loose coupling, but it can be intimidating to use. Finally, you'll get deep experience with two exciting Spring Cloud projects that make messaging approachable to any developer. After this course, you'll have the skills and confidence to expand your microservices architecture in a maintainable way.

About the author
About the author

Richard Seroter is the VP of Product Marketing at Pivotal, with a master’s degree in Engineering from the University of Colorado. He’s also an 11-time Microsoft MVP for cloud, an instructor for Pluralsight, the lead InfoQ.com editor for cloud computing, and author of multiple books. As Vice President at Pivotal, Richard leads product, customer, technical, and partner marketing teams. Richard maintains a regularly updated blog on topics of architecture and solution design and can be found on Twitter as @rseroter.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hey there everyone, my name's Richard Seroter and welcome to my course about coordinating Java Microservices with Spring Cloud. I'm a Senior Director of product at Pivotal, the company behind the wildly popular Spring framework. Spring Boot and Spring Cloud are now the most widely used frameworks for building modern Java apps. With tens of millions of downloads per month for Maven, Spring Boot has exploded in popularity. And Spring Cloud is right behind it at an unstoppable trajectory. Why is that? These projects solve real challenges while also introducing developers to new patterns that result in better applications. In this course, we're going to go deep on the parts of Spring Cloud that make it easier to link together services in a microservices architecture. Some of the things we're going to cover include how to locate and consume microservices at run time, protecting microservices with circuit breakers, routing requests using load balancing and micro proxies, stitching services together via messaging middleware, and building data pipelines. By the end of this course, you'll know how to use five key Spring Cloud libraries and how to use them to deliver more resilient, scalable, and maintainable microservices. Before beginning this course, you'll want to be familiar with Java Programming and Spring Boot, but don't worry, there's help along the way if you're not an expert in either of those. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn all about coordinating Java microservices with Spring Cloud in my course here at Pluralsight.