Java Refactoring: Best Practices

Frustrated or slowed down by messy code? Don't wait for someone else to clean it up - learn how to refactor and do it yourself! This course will walk you through what you need to know for refactoring.
Course info
Rating
(14)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jul 16, 2019
Duration
2h 8m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(14)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jul 16, 2019
Duration
2h 8m
Description

Technical debt grows with the size of any software project. Without refactoring it will eventually fail, thus refactoring may be considered an essential skill of any professional software engineer. In this course, Java Refactoring: Best Practices, you will learn how to efficiently refactor and produce cleaner software. First, you will see what code smells are, and why they are bad for your codebase. Then, you will explore how to recognize and refactor them using a variety of techniques to achieve cleaner and more maintainable code. Finally, you will discover the most important principles that apply to refactoring and clean code. By the end of this course, you will have the necessary skills to convert a mess into flexible and robust software, one line at a time.

About the author
About the author

Andrejs is a Quality Assurance professional and participates in the entire SDLC - from requirements analysis, to test creation and their automation.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
(Music) Hi everyone. My name is Andrejs Doronins, and welcome to my course, Java Refactoring: Best Practices. Any serious software project accumulates technical debt over time, and without any refactoring it is likely to fail sooner or later. Refactoring is an essential skill of any professional software engineer, and this course gives you hands-on training how to do it. Some of the major topics that we will cover include identify issues in a software project, understand why they're bad, and how to refactor them. By the end of this course, you will gain the ability to convert clunky and difficult to maintain code into elegant and flexible software. Before beginning the course, you should have some professional experience with Java in any IDE such as IntelliJ or Eclipse and be able to write object-oriented code. I hope you'll join me on this journey to better code quality with the course Java Refactoring: Best Practices, here at Pluralsight.