Fundamentals of Functional Programming in JavaScript

Functional programming is gaining traction in the industry. This course will teach you the foundations of functional programming using JavaScript in easy to understand terms.
Course info
Rating
(96)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jul 11, 2017
Duration
1h 26m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(96)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jul 11, 2017
Duration
1h 26m
Description

In order to be proficient in functional programming there are a few key concepts that you'll need to understand such as immutability and first class functions. In this course, Fundamentals of Functional Programming in JavaScript, you'll learn about functional programming and how to write JavaScript in a functional style. First, you'll cover how you've likely already used functional programming concepts in your JavaScript, and how functional programming can actually simplify how you write software. Next, you'll explore how to utilize functions the same as any other variable. Finally, you'll learn how to write your code so it only changes when you want it to. By the end of this course, you'll have the necessary skills and knowledge to write efficiently with JavaScript in a functional style.

About the author
About the author

Nate's first program was written in QBasic on an 8086 clone his dad built. Since then he's written applications in C++, .NET, and Node.js.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Nate Taylor, and welcome to my course: Fundamentals of Functional Programming in JavaScript. I'm a software engineer at Aviture in Omaha, Nebraska. Have you ever tried to learn functional programming but ended up feeling like you weren't smart enough, or you weren't sure where you'd actually use it? In this course, we're going to cover the basics of functional programming, and we'll do so using JavaScript. We'll take functional programming concepts and break them down so that they're easier to understand. Some of the topics that we will cover include: what functional programming is, how you can be more clear and expressive with your code, how to use functions the same as you would any other variable, and how to write your code so it only changes when you want it to. By the end of this course, you'll know the basic tenants of functional programming, as well as how you can write JavaScript in a functional style. Before beginning this course, you should be familiar with basic JavaScript syntax. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn functional programming with the Fundamentals of Functional Programming in JavaScript course, at Pluralsight.

Testing Your Functions
It's been a few months since Bob started his journey towards learning functional programming. He's learned a lot and grown even more. While he's still just one of several developers at Sunware, his job satisfaction has never been higher. Throughout this time, Bob worked diligently to start writing code in a more declarative approach. He also got really good at composing functions, and while he didn't initially like using immutable data structures, after all he enjoyed being able to change an object whenever he wanted, he eventually came around when he saw that controlling when changes happen made his code more stable. After he'd implemented seamless immutable on his project, he resumed his previous chat with Alice. He asked her if there were still some opening positions on her team. She told him that there were and if he wanted one of the open slots, it was his. He jumped at the chance. After all, Alice had already taught him so much. He could only imagine what he would learn from her if he was on her team. That was three months ago, and Bob's prediction was absolutely right. As much as he'd grown in the first few months prior to joining Alice's team, he'd grown at least that much in the three months on her team. During the first couple of weeks on the team, Bob was asked to contribute to several different code reviews. He loved the opportunity of seeing other people's code and learning from it. One thing he'd noticed was that all of his new teammates pull requests always had lots of tests. As he looked into the tests on the latest PR, he noticed something. They seemed way more straightforward than he was used to. He'd tried writing unit tests in the past, but they always felt burdensome. If they were really as easy and clean as his teammates made them look, he couldn't wait to learn how to write them.