Javascript Generators and Iterators

Iterators and iterables are very commonly used in JavaScript applications. This course will teach you all about iterators, built-in iterables, and how to control execution flow using generator functions.
Course info
Rating
(62)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Dec 31, 2019
Duration
1h 25m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(62)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Dec 31, 2019
Duration
1h 25m
Description

Understanding iterators, iterables, and generator functions can be difficult. In this course, JavaScript Generators and Iterators, you will learn foundational knowledge of these constructs so that you feel comfortable using them every day. First, you will understand what iterators are and a few of the available built-in iterables. Next, you will discover generator functions and the yield keyword. Finally, you will explore how to use Cancelable Async Flows to help treat your generator functions like async functions. When you are finished with this course, you will have the skills and knowledge of iterators and generator functions needed to start using them today.

About the author
About the author

Software engineer in Chicago with 10+ years of experience working Javascript applications on both the client side and the server side.

More from the author
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Marques Woodson, and welcome to my course, JavaScript Generators and Iterators. I am a staff software engineer at project44 in Chicago. As JavaScript users, we use iteration almost every day. Understanding iterators and how they work is essential to being an efficient developer. In this course, we are going to learn all about JavaScript's built‑in, as well as custom iterators, and generator functions. Some of the major topics that we will cover include how to create a custom iterator, old and new built‑in iterators, how to pause and continue function execution with generator functions, and simplifying async logic with cancelable async flows. By the end of this course, you'll know what a built‑in iterable is and why a for of loop works the way that it does. You'll understand how to create an iterator and why you'd want to use custom iterators in your code. Finally, you'll learn all about generator functions and how to pause and continue your function using an iterator. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with basic JavaScript data structures and loops. Also, having some experience using the command line to run Node scripts would be helpful. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn all about iterators with the JavaScript Generators and Iterators course, at Pluralsight.