JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Fundamentals

Enterprise financial management is no easy task, but this course can help. You'll get a foundational overview of Oracle's JD Edwards EnterpriseOne ERP solution, covering topics such as the fat client, interactive applications, and more.
Course info
Rating
(10)
Level
Beginner
Updated
May 24, 2016
Duration
1h 55m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(10)
Level
Beginner
Updated
May 24, 2016
Duration
1h 55m
Description

Are you a developer, business analyst, CNC, or end user looking to use EnterpriseOne for the first time? This course, JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Fundamentals, is an absolute must, targeting the very latest release of EnterpriseOne (9.2), Oracle's Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software. First, you'll learn how to get a VirtualBox VM running and create a standalone instance of EnterpriseOne. Next, you'll be guided through EnterpriseOne’s architecture, the fat client, the web client, batch, and interactive applications. Lastly, you'll be shown how data is stored in EnterpriseOne. By the end of this course, you'll know everything you need to know to start your journey into EnterpriseOne.

About the author
About the author

Shaun Meyer is an independent consultant with over 15 years of development experience in Oracle’s JD Edwards EnterpriseOne, JD Edwards World and Microsoft’s .NET framework.

More from the author
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

What Is JD Edwards EnterpriseOne?
Hello my name is Shaun Meyer from Pluralsight, and welcome to this course on JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Fundamentals. EnterpriseOne, or as it's more often referred to in the industry as E1, is an ERP software package, which is owned by Oracle. E1 is incredibly well loved by its very passionate user base. And that's quite an accomplishment for an ERP system. This is a very active and exciting space to be in, and the aim of this course is to walk users through their very first look at the software. We'll start by talking about who this course is actually aimed at, and the various user roles one can have within the E1 space. Then the course requirements, which are pretty minimal. Next, we'll go right back to the beginning to define ERP, and then talk about the history of E1. And lastly, we'll have a look at E1's system architecture. Now this is pretty important stuff, but we're going to keep it very light and very low level for this course. So let's get started by talking about this course's intended audience.

Interacting with the EnterpriseOne User Interfaces
Hi, and welcome back to this introductory course on JD Edwards EnterpriseOne Fundamentals. In this module we're going to concentrate on E1's user interface, and there are in fact two UIs we need to look at. The first one is called the fat client, which is mostly used by developers on powerful desktop machines. Back in the day this is what all users saw. Developers would use a fat client and everyone else would have the same experience, but using thin clients running Citrix or Terminal Server. But that has all been phased out, thin clients have evolved into web clients, which is what you see here. In this module we'll cover both clients, basic navigation, changing user preferences, the Fast Path, carousel, favorites, and then we're all have a look at the object management workbench on the fat client. In the next clip we'll take a look at the fat client in a bit more detail.

Working with Interactive Applications
Hi, this is Shaun Meyer, and welcome back to this fundamentals course on JD Edwards EnterpriseOne. In this module, we're going to explore interactive applications. We'll start by looking at naming conventions. E1 has a very strict set of standards and conventions as to how objects are named. Then we'll look at how to navigate an application, its layout, and the standard menus. Next we'll look a queries and watch lists, then errors and warnings, the grid, and lastly, interactive versions and processing options. So let's get started with naming conventions for interactive applications.

Understanding Important EnterpriseOne Concepts
Welcome back to this introductory course to JD Edwards EnterpriseOne. My name is Shaun Meyer, and in this module we will be exploring some fundamental E1 concepts. These concepts are very important to E1, but luckily, not very complicated, and therefore don't deserve a module of their very own. They are, however, used everywhere in E1, so you need to have a good understanding about how they work. First up, we are going to look at user-defined codes, or UDCs. These are basically lists that hold valid values and are used to validate user input. Then we'll have a look at next numbers. This is functionality that keeps track of any sequential numbering in E1, for example, the next order number, the next item number, the next address number, etc. This ensures that duplicate key information is not created. Next is media objects. This is an efficient and easy way to attach media, such as images, URLs, and text documents to application records. As a dev, you probably won't be adding media objects to records on a day-to-day basis, but you will definitely end up writing code to retrieve them, at some point. Then we'll look at messaging and the work center. And lastly, a quick look at menus, but we aren't going to spend a lot of time with menus. Generally speaking, business analysts or CNC will take care of adding objects to menus. So let's jump right in and explore UDCs and the problem that they so very elegantly solve.

Understanding How Data Is Stored in EnterpriseOne
Hey everyone, and welcome back to this final module in the introductory course to JD Edwards EnterpriseOne. This is a very important module because we will look at how data is stored in E1. Almost every single application you write in E1 will grab data out of a database, display it to the user, or manipulate it in some manner, and then store it back in the database. So you obviously need a solid understanding of how this all hangs together. In this module, we will look at two applications used to view data in the database. The first one is called UTB, or the Universal Table Browser. This is used on the fat client, mostly by developers, and then the data browser, which is used on the web client, and is a little more modern, but not as low level at UTB. Then the data dictionary. This is the lowest level before you hit the middleware. DD items are essentially columns in a database table. But rather than define the properties of the column each time it's added to the database table, it's defined once in the DD, and the middleware keeps coming back to the DD to see how that column is configured. Next we'll look at tables, and tables are a collection of DD items. And then business views, which are a collection of tables, or a single table, even a handful of columns in a table. Batch and interactive applications in E1 don't reference tables directly, they reference business views, which in turn, reference the tables. So let's jump right in and start looking at UTB and the data browser.