CentOS Enterprise Linux 7 User and Group Management

Not only will you learn how to manage local users and groups, you will also learn how to install and configure OpenLDAP Directories and Kerberos Authentication.
Course info
Rating
(32)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Mar 1, 2016
Duration
4h 20m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Introduction to Linux User and Group Management and the Associated Certification
Managing Login Scripts
Creating and Managing Local Users in CentOS 7
Managing Local Groups in CentOS 7
Using PAM to Control User Access
Implementing OpenLDAP Directories on CentOS 7
Implementing OpenLDAP Authentication in CentOS 7
Implementing Kerberos Authentication
Description
Course info
Rating
(32)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Mar 1, 2016
Duration
4h 20m
Description

Being able to manage local users and groups fits into the realm of the system administrator, but if you are going to take these users and groups seriously, then you will also need to know how to work with OpenLDAP. The course starts gently introducing you to the idea of the local user and groups and their storage databases before moving on to enterprise solutions with LDAP directories and Kerberos authentication.

About the author
About the author

Andrew is a committed evangelist of the Linux Operating System and the concept of community and freedom that it provides. He has worked as a technical trainer since 1995 and has taught throughout the world, including Australia, the US, Germany and Eastern Europe. Andrew started teaching Linux in 2004 when Novell acquired SUSE and has been a long time supporter of Novell and provides SYSOP support the the Certifed Novell Instructor community on Linux. Andrew founded theurbanpenguin and has been submitting video training material to his YouTube channel since 2009 and currently has over 8,500 subscribers and 1.6 Million views. Andrew has had two publications with Packt: Citrix Access Gateway VPX Essentials (2012) and Citrix XenApp (2013).

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, and welcome. My name is Andrew Mallett and I'd like to introduce you to my course, CentOS Enterprise Linux 7 User and Group Management. Now I'm the owner of The Urban Penguin within the UK, and I train and consult in Linux administration, and I dabble just a little in development. With the use of Linux on the increase it is your time to book your seat in the front row for the best job opportunities. Learning Linux now has never been so promising with the increased focus with the Azure Cloud. Working through this course you will learn how to manage CentOS 7 users and groups throughout their lifetime. Some of the major topics that we will look at include, Pluggable Authentication Module, or PAM, looking at LDAP, or Lightweight Directory Access Protocol directories, and Kerberos-based authentication. By the end of this course you will be able to manage local and directory-based users and groups and set up different authentication mechanisms. Before beginning this course, you should have already sat the CentOS Enterprise Linux 7 Essentials course or have similar knowledge.

Implementing OpenLDAP Directories on CentOS 7
Hello, and welcome to this presentation from Pluralsight. My name is Andrew Mallett, and I'm here as your instructor to guide you through the module where we take a look at implementing OpenLDAP directories on our CentOS 7 systems. As we work our way through, the objective that we're going to be taking a look at is configuring an LDAP server to support centralized user login. So rather than having lots of separate passwords and shadow files all over the place, we can centralize our user account on one LDAP server. Now in support of this objective we've got a few demonstrations for you to take a look at. We'll be looking at installing OpenLDAP, so getting our server up and running; configuring the OpenLDAP server; creating our top-level LDAP directory structure; and then going through and creating our groups and users within the LDAP directory. So when you're ready, we'll get started with our first demonstration where we take a look at installing OpenLDAP.

Implementing OpenLDAP Authentication in CentOS 7
Hello, and welcome to this presentation from Pluralsight. My name is Andrew Mallett, and we're going to take a look now at how we can set up LDAP authentication on CentOS 7. We've already configured our OpenLDAP server, and that was configured in the previous module, and if that's not already set up, then you're going to need that OpenLDAP server to be able to authenticate to from this module. And we're looking at here being able to configure a client to use LDAP for user and group information. As we run through, we're going to be packing it full of demonstrations, and we're going to be first of all looking at installing and configuring the OpenLDAP client and making sure that we've got the full plumbing necessary, being able to resolve host names, etc. , before we connect through to our server. With that done, we then should be able to list our users and group, and, of course, be able to use it for authentication. We'll also look at how we can use some of the LDAP tools to be able to search for user and group. Remember, LDAP itself is a directory service, it's not necessarily there solely for authentication. We can use it almost as a white pages for our organization as well. Now to begin with, we're going to start by taking a look at installing and configuring the OpenLDAP client.

Implementing Kerberos Authentication
Hello, and welcome to this Pluralsight presentation. My name is Andrew Mallett, and I'm here as your instructor to help guide you through the module where we take a look at implementing Kerberos-based authentication on our CentOS 7. 2 systems. Now you know we've been working towards the exam objectives of the Linux Foundation Certified System Admin, but also those of the Red Hat Certified System Administrator. And in this module, we're aiming to meet the objective of configure a system to authenticate using Kerberos. As we run through, of course we'll be putting in a whole load of demonstrations for you, and we'll start off configuring NTP, our time server, because we're going to need accurate time on both the Kerberos clients and the Kerberos server. We'll then be installing and configuring the key distribution center, so this is really our Kerberos server, and we're going to then establish Kerberos authentication through to SSH. So this is a simple demonstration as a lot of users will be connecting via our SSH remotely to the server. And it is really services we Kerberize, to allow authentication to the service through Kerberos tokens. Once we set that up, and we can set that initially up on the same server as the KDC, but we could also then allow additional Kerberos clients to use the same KDC, so this way we can authenticate to one system and then present our Kerberos tokens through to other systems being pre-authenticated. So this gives you an idea of what we're going to look at. Let's start off now by looking at configuring NTP.