Maya Modeling Reference Library: Edit UVs

In this series of Maya tutorials, we will be taking a detailed look at each of the commands found in Maya's Edit UVs menu. Software required: Maya 2012.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Mar 1, 2012
Duration
2h 1m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Mar 1, 2012
Duration
2h 1m
Description

In this series of Maya tutorials, we will be taking a detailed look at each of the commands found in Maya's Edit UVs menu. Each video tutorial is a self-contained lesson centering on one of the commands found in the Edit UVs menu in Maya. This means that these lessons can be viewed in any order you wish, allowing you to jump straight to the content that is most relevant to you. Over the course of these tutorials, we'll take a detailed look at each of the Edit UVs commands and how each of them can be used to speed up our workflow. Software required: Maya 2012.

About the author
About the author

Dan is an author at Pluralsight with a passion for helping others. Long before Dan ever officially donned his recording headset, he was a dedicated forum moderator with Digital-Tutors (now a Pluralsight company), helping out members with problems they encountered across a wide variety of software. Since then, he joined our team and continues to help others every day with their CG challenges.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
In this lesson, we'll look at the Normalize command. Now with the Normalize command, we can very quickly scale our UVs to fit within our zero to one UV texture space. So in order to run in this command, we simply need to select the object or we can select a number of faces that we want to run the command on. I'm going to go ahead and select this object here. And then we come into our Polygons menu set, come up to our Edit UVs, and Normalize. Now we can actually access this here in our UV Texture Editor under Polygons and Normalize, so whichever way you prefer to access that. I'm going to go ahead and open up the Option box here because by default, our option is to normalize this collectively. Now what this means is basically it's going to resize or scale the entire UV shell of the object we have selected or of the faces that we have selected as one piece or collectively. So, for example, here I have multiple faces on this plane that makes up the monitor screen here. As we can see here in the UV Texture Editor, there's multiple faces in here, and if I were to select the UV, hold down Control, right click and go to the Shell, we can see that these are all part of the same UV shell. So when I normalize this, if I leave this at the default of Collectively, go ahead and hit Apply and Close here, we can see that it's going to normalize my UVs as one shell. So if I come in, select my UV, come in and select the entire shell, we can see that it's still maintained as single UV shell. Now the other option is to actually split this up into different UV shells. Now rather than going back to my Option box which I could do we can actually adjust there here in our polyNormalize node that gets created. So if I select my object, come into my Attribute Editor, we'll find a polyNormalize node here. Now under Normalize type, we have Collective which, since we had this set to collectively normalize our UVs, we also have the ability to separate these. So we can see what happens when I adjust this. Now it's the same as if I'd come in and normalized as each face separately. But we can see the effect that this is having on the texture of our object, and here in the UV Texture Editor, if I kind of make this a full screen here so we can see it a little bit easier, if I were to select one of my UVs, go to the shell, we can see that each face is actually a completely different UV shell, so rather than normalizing all of our UVs to fit within our zero to one texture space collectively, what Maya has actually done is it's broken up each face into a separate UV shell and then gone ahead and scaled that up in order to fit within our zero to one UV texture space. Now this option is actually working very much in the same way as the Unitize command does, but we do have another lesson that covers that command. So here I'm going to go ahead and undo this real quickly just to get my UVs back into the zero one texture space. If I come back in and select my object, come into my polyNormalize node, we do have one other option here available to us. I'm going to go ahead and set this back to Collective. Since I usually prefer to work with the Collective leaf, I've built my UV shells in a specific manner. We actually have the ability to preserve our aspect ratio. Now in this case we can see that our monitor here is actually a wide-screen monitor, so we probably don't really want to stretch our UVs like the Normalize command is going to do to fit within the zero to one texture space. So if we've gone ahead and scaled this in a specific aspect ratio that we may need, we can preserve that simply by checking the Preserve Aspect Ratio option. We can see the effect that that's having on our UVs here in the UV Texture Editor, so this is with it off, it's gone ahead and scaled that up to fit fully within our zero to one texture space, and if we preserve the aspect ratio, it's only going to scale it up until it hits the boundaries of the zero to one texture space, but it's not going to scale it up both in the U and the V, it's only going to scale it up until it fits within our zero to one texture space while preserving that aspect ratio. So that's a quick look at how we can use the Normalize command in order to scale our UVs to fit within the zero to one UV texture space.