Maya Modeling Reference Library: Proxy

In this series of Maya tutorials, we will be taking a detailed look at each of the commands found in Maya's Proxy menu. Software required: Maya 2011.
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Sep 2, 2011
Duration
19m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Sep 2, 2011
Duration
19m
Description

In this series of Maya tutorials, we will be taking a detailed look at each of the commands found in Maya's Proxy menu. Each video in this tutorial is a self-contained lesson centering on one of the commands found in the Proxy menu in Maya. This means that these lessons can be viewed in any order you wish, allowing you to jump straight to the content that is most relevant to you. Over the series of tutorials, we'll take a detailed look at each of the Proxy commands and how each of them can be used to speed up our workflow. Software required: Maya 2011.

About the author
About the author

Dan is an author at Pluralsight with a passion for helping others. Long before Dan ever officially donned his recording headset, he was a dedicated forum moderator with Digital-Tutors (now a Pluralsight company), helping out members with problems they encountered across a wide variety of software. Since then, he joined our team and continues to help others every day with their CG challenges.

More from the author
Introduction to Bifrost in Maya
Beginner
2h 12m
Mar 8, 2016
More courses by Dan LeFebvre
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
[Autogenerated] in this lesson. Well, look at the sub. Give proxy Command. Now the subject Proxy Command is going to duplicate our mesh and apply a smoothing operation to that mesh while keeping the original low resolution mesh as a proxy. So, for example, here I have this low resolution match. Let's go ahead and select that. Come to my polygons menu said Goto proxy and subbed If proxy, go ahead and open up the option box here and make sure our settings are reset. Now, as you can see, there are three sections in this options here. So the top is going to give us our smoothing controls that we have are mirroring controls. And lastly, we have the controls for how our subject proxy is going to be displayed in our view port. Now these are organized with the top to bottom workflow. So let's start at the top and work our way down. Now the first thing we need to do is to tell Maya what smoothing algorithm to use or what smoothing method to use. Now, this is going to be the algorithm that Maya uses in order to subdivide our mesh. If we noticed, we actually have the ability to use Maya's smooth mesh preview as a smoothing algorithm for our subject proxy. And if we choose this, it's going to use that algorithm is not going to give us any of the smoothing controls. Now we have the exponential as well as linear smoothing controls. Now, the exponential and linear smoothing algorithms are the same as can be found in the smooth operation under the mesh menu. So I'm not gonna go into detail and how to cover recover these specific algorithms in depth here. If you'd like to look, Maura, about how these algorithms work on recommend you look for the lesson on the smooth operation in the Maya modeling Reference library mesh course. So I'm just gonna go ahead and leave this at the default of the exponential Smooth. Let's go ahead and just go ahead and smooth this out. So as we can see, we have to mesh is now we have our original mesh that have been turned into the proxy, and underneath it we actually have our smooth mesh. What's really cool about this is that if I take the original mesh that is now our proxy and make any sort of modifications to it. It's gonna update the smooth mesh underneath it. So just so we could see this a little bit easier, I'm gonna go ahead and turn on my wire frame on shaded here so we can see the mesh underneath. And then if I select my proxy and make any sort of adjustment, say, if I wanted to In certain edge loop, we can see how the mesh the high rez mesh underneath it is being updated from the information being given to it from the proxy. Now, this can really come in handy if we have a high resolution mesh that's bogging down our scene. Because as long as there's the proxy connection between the low resolution proxy and the high resolution smooth mesh, it doesn't really matter if the's smooth mash is visible within our scene or not. So if I were to actually select the high resolution mash here, turn off my wire frame. Unshaded. If I were to select this and actually hide it, control H to hide it so we can only see our proxy mesh. I can still make changes to this proxy. So if I wanted to delete a few of these faces, we can simply do eat those. And if I were to bring back my high resolution mesh so I can show the last hidden, we can see that those changes have been reflected on the high resolution mesh, even though it wasn't visible in our view port. So what else can we do with the sub Dave Proxy Command? I'm gonna go ahead and clear this out, and one of the other options that we can do is to actually mirror the mesh has come back into our proxy option box here, and we'll find the ability to adjust the mirror behavior. Now, by default. It's set a nun, which is what we had before and did not mirror our mesh. Now, if we notice when we have this set none. We have the ability to share the transform note between a proxy mash and the smooth mesh. Now, this option isn't available if we have mirroring enable. So if I switch this to a full mirror, this is going to gray out. Same if I switch this to 1/2 now, what's the difference between a full mirror and 1/2 mirror? Now the full mirror is going to not only mirror are smooth mashed, but it's also going to mirror our proxy. And it's important to point out that the mirror direction is referring to the world axes. So, for example, with this particular mesh, I would want to mirror this in the X and the negative X actually in order to mirror on the opposite side and get some expected results. So I'm going to switch this to Negative X. I'll leave this at a full so we can see what the full mirror looks like. Go ahead and smooth this and we can see that we have. Our mesh has been mirrored. Not only the high resolution mesh has been mirrored as well as it's actually been merged in the center. We have the ability to adjust this after the fact, if we wanted to, it's also been combined, but we also have the proxy that's been mirrored on the opposite side as well. So any sort of changes we make to the proxy on one side is going to be automatically updated on the mirror side, and the same goes if we were to make a new adjustment here on the mirrored side. It's also going toe update our original proxy automatically. So let's take a look at the half mirror. Now I'm gonna come in and just once again, clear this out so we can kind of start from scratch again to go back into our option box and rather than the full mirror, take a look at the half mirror. I'm gonna leave my mirror direction as well as the Vertex tolerance. At the same, we could go ahead and apply. That we can see that are smooth. Mesh has been mirrored over, but the proxy has not. So we only we have the proxy on one side on the original side, we actually have on Lee the smooth mesh that's been mirrored over now. We still have the connection so we can come in and make any sort of changes that we may need to. And it's going to reflect those changes on the smooth and mesh on the mirrored side. So it kind of depends on what your preferred workflow is and for your particular project. Now, the last options here within the option box for the sub Dave proxy have to do with as the says the display settings. So these aren't going to affect the sub Dave proxy on the mesh itself but is actually going to simply change how it's displayed in the view port. Now we've seen the default shader. That's the transparent shade of kind of the translucent shader that we had seen with a little bit of transparency on it. We also have the ability to completely remove the shader from the proxy. So if I were to have this selected and hit apply, we can see it's not going to have a shader on the proxy. We still have our connections. We can still update the smooth mesh if we want to, but it's going to simply remove the shader. We have the ability to keep the Shader, so it'll keep the current shader on the proxy when we go ahead and apply that now, These last few options here actually give us the ability to either determine whether or not the proxy is going to be Regnery ble in our scene. So if we don't want our proxy to render out, we can simply uncheck that we also have the ability to add both the proxy and the smooth mesh onto a new display earlier, as well as determining whether or not the smooth is either normal set to a template, mode or reference here in the display lit. So let's take a look. Just keep an eye here on the display layers. I'm gonna turn on the subject proxy and the smooth mesh so we should get to new display layers one for each, and have the smooth mesh turned into a reference. Go ahead and hit smooth. We can see that we've had our display layers created one for the proxy, one for the smooth mesh, and the smooth mesh has automatically been set to a reference mode, so we don't have to worry about accidentally selecting this move. Mesh. We can make our changes here on the proxy mesh. Have it propagate to the other side here, And since this is on its own display layer, set to a reference, we don't have to worry about accidentally making changes that we may not want to do on the smooth match. So that's a look at the options available to us with the subject Proxy command, so that we can update a low resolution version of our mesh and then have those changes propagate to the smooth version of our mesh