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Microsoft Azure Developer: Implementing Blob Storage

Azure Blob Storage provides massively scalable storage for unstructured data like images, videos, or documents. This course teaches you how to set up Azure Blob Storage and how to use it in your .NET applications.
Course info
Rating
(30)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 29, 2018
Duration
3h 57m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Setting up Blob Storage
Uploading Blobs from .NET
Listing Blobs in .NET
Downloading and Deleting Blobs
Storing Metadata on Your Blobs
Using Shared Access Signatures
Managing Concurrency
Copying and Archiving Blobs
Monitoring Blob Storage
Description
Course info
Rating
(30)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 29, 2018
Duration
3h 57m
Description

At the core of storing massive amounts of unstructured data like images, videos, or documents in Microsoft Azure is a thorough knowledge of Azure Blob Storage. In this course, Microsoft Azure Developer: Implementing Blob Storage, you will learn the skills you need to use Azure Blob Storage in your applications. First, you will learn how to set up Azure Blob Storage in the Azure Portal. Next, you will learn how to upload, download, list, and delete blobs in .NET with C#. Finally, you will learn how to control access to your blobs with Shared Access Signatures, how to manage concurrency, and how to monitor your Blob Storage. When you’re finished with this course, you will have a foundational knowledge of Azure Blob Storage that will help you immensely as you move forward to build your own applications and solutions that need to store unstructured data in Microsoft Azure.

About the author
About the author

Thomas is a well-known author, software developer, and speaker from Germany. He specializes in .NET, C#, TypeScript, XAML, and Azure.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Thomas Claudius Huber, and welcome to my course, Microsoft Azure Developer: Implementing Blob Storage. I am a software developer and I have a passion for building professional applications with. NET and Microsoft Azure. In this course, you will learn how to use Azure Blob storage in your applications to store any type of unstructured data like images, videos, audio, or documents. Azure Blob storage is easy to use, massively scalable, and also cost effective. Some of the major topics that we will cover include setting up Blob storage in the Azure portal, working with blobs in. NET, using shared access signatures to grant access to your blobs, managing concurrency to hinder concurrent write operations to your blobs, and copying and archiving blobs. By the end of this course, you will know how to use Azure Blob storage in your applications to store any kind of unstructured data. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with the C# programming language. No prior experience with Azure Blob storage is required. I hope you will join me on this journey to learn about Azure Blob storage with the Microsoft Azure Developer: Implementing Blob Storage course, at Pluralsight.

Uploading Blobs from .NET
Welcome to the module, Uploading Blobs from. NET. My name is Thomas Claudius Huber, and in this module, you will learn how to use the Azure Storage client library for. NET to upload your blobs to Blob storage. Let's take a look at the module outline. First of all, we will ensure that you understand the Coffee Video Admin application. As you know, this is the application the Wired Brain Coffee company wants to use to manage their videos in Blob storage. The first version of the app has the functionality to select a video from the local file system. In this module, you will learn how to use the Azure Storage client library for. NET to upload that video blob to a container and to check if the blob exists already in that container. After we have written the code to upload blobs from. NET, you will learn how to access and manage your storage account with the Azure Storage Explorer and with Visual Studio's Cloud Explorer. These are tools that you can use alternatively or in addition to the Azure portal. At the end of this module, you will learn how to develop locally with the Azure storage emulator. That emulator emulates an Azure storage account locally, which means you don't need an Azure subscription to start coding with Blob storage. Now, let's start, and let me show you the first version of the Coffee Video Admin app.

Listing Blobs in .NET
Welcome to the module, Listing Blobs in. NET. My name is Thomas Claudius Huber, and in this module, I will show you how to list the blobs of a blob container in. NET. Let's take a look at the module outline. At the beginning of this module, you will learn how to list the blobs of a container. You will write the code to get the list of blobs contained in the coffeevideos container so that this blob list can be shown in the Coffee Video Admin application. That application was extended a bit by the Wired Brain Coffee developers so that you can focus on the code to access Blob storage. Of course, I will show you what the developers have added. After you wrote the code to list the blobs, we ensured that you understand how to use the BlobContinuationToken. With this token, you can build a pagination, which means you can get the total list of blobs in separate chunks. In the last clip of this module, you will learn how to filter the blobs with a prefix. Filtering with a prefix means that you get a filtered list of blobs where all the blob names start with a specified prefix. Now, let's start, and let's list the blobs of a container in. NET.

Downloading and Deleting Blobs
Welcome to the module, Downloading and Deleting Blobs. My name is Thomas Claudius Huber, and in this module, I will show you how to download and delete blobs in. NET. Let's take a look at the module outline. As you know, you can access a blob via its URL. The Wired Brain Coffee developers do exactly this to play videos in the Coffee Video Admin app. Instead of manually downloading a blob and playing it, they use the URL as input for a media element. At the beginning of this module, I will show you the code they have written to play videos. After that, you will implement the logic in the CoffeeVideoStorage class to download a blob. A user of the application should be able to download the blob from Blob storage to a file. Next, you will implement the logic to delete a blob. In the last clip of this module, you will learn how to configure soft delete for Blob storage in the Azure portal. When you have configured soft delete, blobs are not deleted, but just marked as deleted. This allows you to recover deleted blobs. Now let's start, and let me show you the code that was added to the Coffee Video Admin app to play videos.

Storing Metadata on Your Blobs
Welcome to the module, Storing Metadata on Your Blobs. My name is Thomas Claudius Huber. In this module, you will learn how to store key-value pairs as metadata on your blobs. Let's take a look at the module outline. The Wired Brain Coffee company wants to store a title and a short description for each video in Blob storage. I will show you how to set metadata on containers and blobs in the Azure portal. You will learn how to use that metadata to store a title and a description on a blob. After you know how to use the Azure portal to store metadata on your blobs, you will learn how to use that metadata in. NET. I will show you how to fetch metadata from a blob. You will also learn how to include the metadata when you are listing blobs because the metadata is not loaded by default when you get a list of blobs from Blob storage. Next, I will show you how to set metadata on a blob and how to remove metadata from a blob. In the last clip, you will learn how to set metadata when you upload a new blob to Blob storage. Now, let's start and let's store a title and a description on a blob.

Using Shared Access Signatures
Welcome to the module, Using Shared Access Signatures. My name is Thomas Claudius Huber, and in this module, you will learn how to use shared access signatures to grant access to your blobs. Let's take a look at the module outline. At the beginning of this module, I will show you the ASP. NET Core web application the Wired Brain Coffee developers have built for their customers. To play videos, they use the blob URL with an HTML video element. But of course, all those blob URLs are visible in the website's HTML, and they can be used by anyone in their website. That the URLs are just reusable is something the Wired Brain Coffee company does not want. That's the reason why you will set the container's Public access level to Private, which means you can't access blobs via their URLs anymore. But you will learn how to access your blobs with a shared access signature. I will show you what a shared access signature is, you will learn how to create a shared access signature in the Azure portal, and I will show you how to create a shared access signature in. NET. At the end of this module, we will ensure that you know the two different types of shared access signatures. Now let's start, and let's take a look at the ASP. NET Core web application.

Managing Concurrency
Welcome to the module, Managing Concurrency. My name is Thomas Claudius Huber, and in this module, you will learn how to manage the situation when multiple users try to update the same blob simultaneously. This situation is known as concurrency. Let's take a look at the module outline. At the beginning of this module, I will show you what happens when two users update the same blob. Then you will learn about the different ways to manage concurrency. By default, the last update wins, which means the blob of the user who updates last is stored. But there are other ways to manage concurrency. Besides the last update wins approach, you will learn in this module about optimistic concurrency, which means before you update, you check if the blob was changed in the meantime by another user. You will also learn about pessimistic concurrency, which means you lock the blob so that no other user can update it anymore. Now let's start and let me show you that by default the last update wins when two users update the same blob.

Copying and Archiving Blobs
Welcome to the module, Copying and Archiving Blobs. My name is Thomas Claudius Huber, and in this module, you will learn how to create copies of you blobs and how to archive your blobs. Let's take a look at the module outline. We start this module with blob snapshots. The snapshot is a read- only copy of a blob taken at a point in time, and so a powerful backup feature. You will learn in this module how to create a snapshot and how to access a snapshot via its URL. You will also learn how to promote a snapshot, which means that you copy the snapshot back to its base blob. After you are familiar with snapshots, you will learn how to archive a blob in another container. I will show you how you can copy a blob to another container and how you can set the access tier on the copied blob to cool. Now let's start with blob snapshots.

Monitoring Blob Storage
Welcome to the module, Monitoring Blob Storage. My name is Thomas Claudius Huber. Throughout this course, you learned how to write code in. NET to access blob storage. In this module, I want to show you how you can monitor your blob storage. The module outline is very compact. I will show you in a demonstration how you can use the Azure portal to view and export blob metrics. After that, we will wrap up what you have learned in this course. Now let's start with the blob metrics.