Microsoft Azure Development for AWS Developers in .NET

Many organizations today are using both Azure and AWS for maximum capability and flexibility in the cloud, creating tremendous opportunities for developers. This course will help you translate your AWS knowledge and skills to the Azure platform.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Nov 6, 2017
Duration
3h 8m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Course Introduction
Azure vs. AWS: A High-level Comparison
Fundamental Azure Concepts
Compute
Building and Deploying Your First Web Application
Databases
Storage
Debugging and Monitoring
Analytics and Intelligence
Course Summary and Next Steps
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Nov 6, 2017
Duration
3h 8m
Description

As cloud computing has grown and evolved over the years, Microsoft and Amazon have emerged as clear leaders in the space. Many organizations use both platforms together for maximum capability and flexibility, and having skills in both areas is becoming more and more essential for developers. In this course, Microsoft Azure Development for AWS Developers, you'll learn how to translate your AWS knowledge and skills to the Azure platform. First, you'll discover the fundamental concepts for getting started, including compute (virtual machines), databases, and storage. Next, you'll learn about monitoring/debugging and tools. Finally, you'll build and deploy your first Azure application. When you're finished with this course, you'll have a foundational understanding of the Microsoft Azure platform and how to develop for it.

About the author
About the author

Amber is a Microsoft Certified Trainer and Microsoft Certified Professional Developer with 15+ years experience working with and teaching Microsoft technologies. She also focuses on professional skills, bridging the gap between techies and non-techies. For her work as a training leader, Amber received Training magazine's 2013 Emerging Training Leader award.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi there. My name is Amber Israelsen, and welcome to my course, Microsoft Azure Development for AWS Developers in. NET. I've been a developer, author, and technical trainer for 15+ years. During that time I've watched cloud computing grow and evolve into what seems like near ubiquity today. From virtual machines to analytics to chat bots, there's such a wide array of services, and there are also a lot of players, but over the years, Microsoft and Amazon have emerged as clear leaders in this space. Many organizations use both platforms together for maximum capability and flexibility, and having skills in both areas is becoming more and more essential for developers. In fact, in 2017, 25% of companies say their biggest challenge with cloud is a lack of resources and expertise, so you're in the right place at the right time. In this course, you'll learn how to translate your AWS knowledge and skills to the Azure platform. You'll learn the fundamental concepts for getting started with Azure, including compute with your virtual machines, databases, storage, monitoring debugging, analytics, and intelligence. You'll even get to build your first application using Visual Studio, and then deploy it to Azure. When you're finished with this course you'll have a foundational understanding of the Microsoft Azure platform and how to develop for it. This course is meant for AWS developers who have a solid understanding of cloud computing concepts and experience with developing for AWS. There will be many comparisons of the two platforms, so familiarity with AWS will help you more readily understand Azure. Knowledge of Azure or Microsoft development tools is not required. I hope you'll join me in this journey to Microsoft's cloud, in Microsoft Azure Development for AWS Developers, at Pluralsight.

Azure vs. AWS: A High-level Comparison
Hi there, and welcome back. I'm Amber Israelsen. In this next module, we're going to start to compare and contrast Azure and AWS at a high level. In our last module, we briefly met Cole, an AWS developer at Wired Brain Coffee in Seattle. If you're coming from the world of AWS yourself, you're probably used to working with AWS Services, starting from a portal that looks like this. Perhaps you've used EC2, or Elastic Compute Cloud, on a regular basis, or you work with Relational Database Services, or RDS. Maybe you work with Simple Storage Services, or S3. Or perhaps you even wear more of an infrastructure hat in dealing with the network, things like Virtual Private Cloud, or VPC. And that's great, I hope you have some or all of that experience, because in this module, we're going to see how those things translate to Microsoft Azure. As a reminder of where we are in the big picture, we're just getting started on our journey here. We'll kick off with some comparisons, taking a high-level look at the two platforms. We'll also cover computing capabilities, database, storage, networking. We'll answer the question, how do I develop for Azure, by looking at tools, languages, operating systems, and some of the open source options that are available in Azure. And then we'll briefly talk about DevOps and how Azure supports that. And wrap up by looking at pricing and the free tiers available to get you started.

Fundamental Azure Concepts
Welcome back to this next module in the course. I'm Amber, and thanks for sticking with me. In the last module, we saw that AWS and Azure both have the same cloud characteristics and offer the same basic services of compute, database, storage, and networking. We also looked at tooling that's similar in both platforms. And all of that is true, but as you're getting started with Azure development you'll find that some names and organizational concepts differ just a little bit. How to get started is a little bit different. So that's what we'll be focusing on in this module. Which, as a reminder of the big picture, brings us up to this point in the overall course. We'll start by talking about accounts, subscriptions, and roles, and some of the differences between AWS and Azure. We'll go in and take a look at the Azure Management portal in a little bit more detail, and then we'll take a look at resource management, how do you manage resources like VMs, apps, databases, and storage in Azure. Finally, we'll talk about where things actually run around the world, regions, zones, and fault domains, and how they differ from what you might be used to doing in Amazon Web Services. Let's get started.

Compute
Hi there, and welcome to this next module in the course about Compute in Azure. So far in this course, I've been talking pretty high level, comparing AWS with Azure, but now it's time to get into the nitty-gritty and actually start building something out in the portal. This module is all about the compute capabilities of Azure and how they compare to AWS. In AWS, you've likely spun up an EC2 instance and you're familiar with a screen that looks like this from the AWS portal. Let's take that knowledge and shift it over to Azure now. Bringing you back to the big picture for just a second, we're moving along nicely. After we're done with this module we'll get to have some fun by creating our first web application in the next module. But first, let's focus on the task at hand. We'll start with a high-level comparison of the compute capabilities of Azure and AWS. Then we'll move in to several demos where I'll show you how to create, configure, and delete an Azure virtual machine. We'll wrap things up by looking at pricing, and specifically pricing for compute resources.

Building and Deploying Your First Web Application
Welcome back, everyone! Thanks for sticking with me. We're up to the fun part of the course where we get to see some code. But just as a brief reminder of where we were last time in the module, it was all about virtual machines. We went and created and configured an Azure VM as a web server. We installed IIS and opened up Port 80 to allow web traffic through. Which is great, but again, you might be thinking, when do we start coding? And that is right now. We're up to this point in the course where we can actually create a new application in Visual Studio. I'll walk you through how to set up Visual Studio so that you can use it with Azure, and then we'll actually create a new web application. For this course, we're going to be using ASP. NET MVC for Microsoft, but I'll also point out some of the open source options available if you're more interested in that. Once we've created the web application, we'll look at two different approaches for deploy it _____ to the cloud. One is deploying it straight to the infrastructure, or the VM that we created in the last module. The other is a PaaS deployment, so not using the VM we created, but we're going to be using Azure App Service. Along the way, I'll make some comparisons to AWS as well. Let's get started.

Databases
Hi there, and welcome back. We've made it to the next module, this one about Databases. To briefly recap the last module, there we built and deployed our first web application, an ASP. NET MVC app, and that all went well, but these days as you probably know, most applications have a database. The application we deployed in the last module actually had a database for authenticating users, and we saw that briefly. In the world of AWS, I assume you would know how to do this. Perhaps you've used RDS, or Relational Database Service, or DynamoDB for NoSQL, maybe even Redshift for data warehousing. In this module, we'll talk about database options in Azure, bringing us past the halfway point in the course. We'll start by doing a high-level comparison of database options in both platforms, then we'll dig a little bit deeper on the database that we'll be using in our demos, which is an Azure SQL database. We'll see how to set up the database in Azure, and then we'll go make some changes to our application in order to get it to work with the database in the cloud. Let's get started.

Storage
Hello, and welcome to this next module in the course about Storage. We're making good progress. In the last module, we set up a SQL Azure database, and then we updated our application to use that instead of our local instance. We created a new user and login for SQL, and then we also had to update our connection string to get everything working. And databases are great for storing transactional data, authenticating users, and so on, but sometimes you need more, which is where cloud storage comes in. In AWS, you might be used to working with services like Simple Storage Service, or S3, Elastic File System, EFS, or Elastic Block Store, EBS. In this module, we're going to look at the storage options in Azure. Which brings us up to this point in the course, well over halfway there. We'll do a high-level comparison of the storage options available in the two platforms. Then we'll move to an overview of Azure Storage and what that looks like. We'll see there are several different kinds of stores. For our purposes, we're going to be focusing on blob storage, one of the more popular storage options you'll be working with as a developer. Then do some demos where we'll set up an Azure storage account and a blob container. Once that's set up, we'll update our web application to use it, kind of like we did with databases in the last module. We'll also take a look at a really handy tool called Azure Storage Explorer, which lets you easily view the contents of your storage in the cloud.

Debugging and Monitoring
Welcome back, everyone, to this module about Debugging and Monitoring in Azure. To recap what we did last time, we focused on storage, and specifically blob storage. We created a storage account and container, and then we updated our application to use that. At this point in the course we have a functioning Azure application using both the database and Azure Blob storage. And that was all pretty easy, everything worked well the first time, but, what if it doesn't? When it all goes wrong, what do you do, how do you debug, or in general, how do you monitor what's going on with your application once it's deployed to the cloud? Just like you have tools in AWS to help with such things, Microsoft also offers tools for debugging and monitoring in Azure. And that's what this module is all about. Here's where we are in the overall course. I've divided up this module into two sections. First we're going to take a look at the Visual Studio tools and do some demos to debug locally, as well as debug remotely, meaning that your application is running in the cloud, but you can still use your local tools to step through code and figure out what's going on. The second section of the module we'll look at monitoring and diagnostics. How do you view the health of your application, its usage, and so forth. We'll look at a couple different tools here including Azure Monitor and Application Insights.

Analytics and Intelligence
Hi there, and welcome to this next module in the course. So far we've covered the fundamentals of compute, database, and storage in Azure, and building on this, Azure has a lot of other capabilities. In this module we'll focus on two of them, namely Analytics and Intelligence. With the world being run by data, analytics is huge these days. Companies want to make sense of all the data and understand their customers better. More and more, data is used to make decisions, and with advances in hardware and software, that's becoming easier every day. Then in the intelligence space, which is largely driven by data and analytics, there are a lot of really cool and useful applications popping up from Chatbox to virtual personal assistants. This is a super exciting and rapidly growing area right now. If you've worked in these spaces in AWS, you might be familiar with Redshift, Elastic MapReduce, or EMR, and Amazon Lex; maybe other services as well. In this module, we'll take a look at what Microsoft has to offer. I've divided this content into two sections, namely analytics and big data, and then intelligence. The module is purposefully very high level; I could create multi-hour long courses on any of these topics, but this is just meant to introduce you to what's out there and then point you to additional learning if you want to dig deeper.