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Designing Migrations for Microsoft Azure

Migrations aren't "one-and-done" activities. They require careful planning and design. This course explores the migration strategies for business applications that are making a move to Microsoft Azure.
Course info
Rating
(13)
Level
Advanced
Updated
Apr 16, 2019
Duration
1h 27m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(13)
Level
Advanced
Updated
Apr 16, 2019
Duration
1h 27m
Description

The word migration might summon a "once and done" activity, but successful migrations require planning, design, and a strong understanding of the target infrastructure if you're to be truly successful. Nowhere is this more relevant than in migrating applications to Microsoft Azure. In this course, Designing Migrations for Microsoft Azure, you'll explore exactly those planning and design elements you'll need to prepare before you ever begin an application's migration into Azure. First, you'll determine your migration strategy. You'll take a look at Microsoft's three-phase approach to assessing your current environment, determining your migration approach, and then optimizing that application once the move is complete. Next, you'll dig into the data availability and resiliency options, as well as the data transfer strategies, that match Azure's services with your application's migration needs. Finally, you'll explore use cases for the migration itself, with the goal of helping you appreciate the best tactics for ensuring the best fit for your application's new Azure residency. By the end of this course, you'll be armed with the knowledge you need to begin planning your application's migration into Microsoft Azure.

About the author
About the author

Greg Shields is an Author Evangelist at Pluralsight.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
With so many options available, deploying a new or existing application into the cloud is as much figuring out Azure's services as it's documenting your application's requirements. I'm Greg Shields, author evangelist, and a full-time author here at Pluralsight, and in this course, Designing Deployments in Microsoft Azure, we'll analyze your application's requirements to get a feel for which Azure services best fit. First, you'll prepare your deployment strategy, getting a feel for how Azure evolves many of the practices in traditional application development. Next, you'll dig deeper into the storage and compute deployment strategies that match Azure's services with your application's needs. Finally, you'll explore Azure's many container and data platform solutions, with a goal of aligning Azure's capabilities with your application requirements. By the end of this course, you'll be armed with the knowledge you need to begin designing your application's deployment there in Microsoft Azure. Let's get started.

Design for Data Availability and Resiliency
Now even though this course doesn't walk through the click-by-click, our conversation here, as well as your design, needs to take into account the different availability and resiliency options that may exist for your application's data. And depending on which solutions, which Azure solutions you choose, those options will be very different. Our conversation here will be another high-level discussion on the different data availability and resiliency options that you'll need to consider as you start designing your migration for each application itself, where I want to talk first about just the options that are out there, and focus then on four specific ones that are important for your consideration. The first of these are the different options for storage itself. In addition to determining whether you'll choose standard or premium storage for what performance you require, there are also other redundancy options that you can choose from, where and how you want this data replicated to different locations either in a datacenter or out in different parts of the globe, will be important for preserving the availability of your application depending on its requirements. We'll talk also here about our availability sets, which present a way for our IaaS-based virtual machines to be protected in the situation where a rack all the way through an entire datacenter may get lost. Those datacenters themselves are in individual regions throughout the globe, and your application may want to span different regions, or even within a region different availability sets to protect the loss of some equipment all the way through an entire geographic location from impacting the availability of your application. Lastly then we also want to talk about the backup and site recovery activities, which will be very different based off of what kinds of resources you'll migrate that app towards. IaaS-based virtual machines have different backup requirements than do applications that are hosted on PaaS-based services. And so we'll talk here about what the backup tasks actually look like for these different options, as well as some of the disaster recovery considerations that you'll want to be thinking about.