Node.js and the Internet of Things Using Intel Edison

A good balance of high level overview and hands on how-to with the Internet of Things (IoT) and the relatively unique approach of using Node.js and JavaScript on IoT devices to make hardware projects quick and easy.
Course info
Rating
(181)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jun 25, 2015
Duration
4h 1m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(181)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jun 25, 2015
Duration
4h 1m
Description

Learn how to enter the exciting world of IoT development without taking on the challenge and inherent constraints of mere microcontrollers. In this course, we'll learn how to command an Intel Edison using Node.js and JavaScript - a more modern platform for more modern and powerful scenarios, including the many options for communicating between devices and between devices and the cloud. We'll see an overview of the hardware and software involved in such projects and then take the time to implement a simple project from start to finish.

About the author
About the author

Developer Evangelist at Microsoft. Coder. Author. Hiker. Sailor. Dad. Husband. Not in that order.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Understanding the Device Landscape
Hi, welcome back, I'm Jeremy Foster. Thanks for watching this course on Nodejs and the internet of things using Intel Edison This module is on understanding the device landscape. You've been formally introduced to the Internet of things now we are moving into a two module section about the devices that can be used as the brains of a project. Most devices or systems are going to have a brain. It's not an absolute necessity. There are digital systems architected without a subsystem that qualifies as a central processing unit. But those aren't very common, usually there's a brain. And in this course we're definitely going to be working with systems that have brains. There are basically just two kinds of devices, microcontrollers and systems on a chip. Microcontrollers are a much simpler architecture and the code that you use to program them is pretty simple too. Systems on a chip are more complex architecture that allows the chip to run a standard operating system like Windows or Linux and that'll let you run node. That's not the only advantage though. Another advantage to running a standard operating system is that there are apps and libraries that you or someone else has already written that will often work just fine in this IoT environment, even if that's not what they were originally intended for. It's great to work with a popular platform because it means a lot of code's already been written. After we look at both types of processors, we'll take a quick look at some of the hardware that you can plug into your device to make it do things. And we will also have a glance at the various methods for the device to communicate outside itself. After we get a good general view, we'll spend the next module looking specifically at one device, the Intel Edison.

Writing and Deploying JavaScript
Hi, welcome back, I'm Jeremy Foster. Thanks for watching this course on Node. js and the Internet of Things using Intel Edison. This module is on writing and deploying JavaScript to your device. We're going to talk less now about hardware, and more about the software that you're going to write and deploy on your device to make it do what you want. Remember that although we chose a specific device, Intel Edison, for this course, most of what you learn about writing Node. js, and even about the modules, will apply to any system on a chip device that can run Node. This is pretty rich for a module, as you can see here, by the eight different sections. First, I'm going to mention the various JavaScript editors that you might choose to use to write your code. I'm going to cover the basics of the code writing itself, and the basics of sending the code to the device, so we can actually run it. Then I'll demo all of that, and then we're going to look at how Visual Studio makes writing code, and debugging, a whole lot better. Finally, I'll do my best to make your life even easier by giving you some guidance on automating the deployment of your code, as well. We'd better get started by looking at text editors for writing our JavaScript. I hardly need to discuss editors, I think, except to assure you that what we're dealing with here is plain old JavaScript files, so you can use your text editor of choice. I don't really stick to a single editor, but I have a little suite of preferences, depending on what I'm doing. If I'm remotely connected to a device, and I want to just tweak something, or even throw together a simple project, I'll use Nano or VI. If I'm developing on my host PC, I'll use Visual Studio, or Visual Studio Code, depending on the environment.