Introduction to NuGet

This is a basic introduction to the NuGet library package management and dependency system that is integrated with Visual Studio. In this course, you will learn how to create and publish NuGet Packages. You will also learn how to host your own NuGet feed and gallery.
Course info
Rating
(317)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 25, 2012
Duration
4h 10m
Table of contents
Introduction
Nuget Package Manager Dialog
NuGet Package Manager Console
Creating Packages
Publishing Packages
Hosting Your Own NuGet Feed
NuGet Community and Advanced Topics
August 2013 Update
Description
Course info
Rating
(317)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 25, 2012
Duration
4h 10m
Description

This course is a basic introduction to NuGet. NuGet is a library and file dependency manager that is integrated into Visual Studio. With NuGet, you can wrap any kind of file (EXE's, DLL's, js/html/css files, source code, etc.) in a NuGet Package. In addition to contained files, a NuGet Package contains meta-data that describes what your files do as well as any dependencies that may exist with other NuGet Packages. NuGet Packages are published to either public or private feeds. The official NuGet feed and gallery can be found at nuget.org. In this course, you will learn how to create and publish packages with the various NuGet Tools. In addition, you will learn how to host your own NuGet Feed and gallery.

About the author
About the author

John has been developing software for over 20 years. Today, he focuses on ASP.NET development and is having more fun than ever solving for clients. John is a Practice Director for Custom Application Development at Neudesic, a Microsoft Gold Partner and the Trusted Technology Partner in Business Innovation. A 10-time recipient of Microsoft’s MVP Award; currently an ASP.NET/IIS MVP. John is also an ASP Insider, and is the INETA Mentorfor PA and WV. John is the author of several books and is a frequent contributor to CODE-Magazine.

Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Nuget Package Manager Dialog
Hi. This is John Petersen of Pluralsight. In this module we're going to explore the specifics on how to use the NuGet Package Manager dialog. Most of your work with NuGet will be in the context of that dialog. If you recall from the previous module, this is the NuGet Package Manager dialog. From here we can see at a glance information about a package. We can also establish and navigate between package sources as well as installing, uninstalling and updating NuGet packages, whether on a project by project basis or for the solution as a whole. In addition to reviewing how the dialogue works and how to navigate between package sources, I will also cover in detail what makes up a NuGet package feed from a package source. The package manager dialog consumes NuGet package source feeds, and your installation can have several feeds active at any given time. As you will come to find out, a NuGet package feed contains a rich set of data that can be queried. This will be very useful to you in the event that you wish to write your own set of custom tools to work with NuGet.

NuGet Package Manager Console
This is John Petersen of Pluralsight. In this module, we're going to focus on the Nuget Package Manager Console. In the previous module we focused on the Nuget Package Manager dialogue. The Package Manager Console is the command line counterpart to the Gooey interface, the dialogue that we typically deal with when we're interfacing with Nuget. And the Package Manager Console in this picture Visual Studio is a simple window with a couple of features in here. In the middle is where we would enter a variety of commands to interface with Nuget. We can select a package source. We can also pick a default project. Many of the things that we can do within the Package Manager dialogue, Gooey. In addition, we can also get access to a number of the Package Manager settings. If we recall, the Package Manager settings is where we could specify which feeds are active with our Nuget installation Visual Studio. In the rest of this module, we're going to do a quick review, an overview and review of the Nuget Package Manager Console over and above what we've covered already in this course, how to navigate the different Nuget Package sources. We'll take a review of the various commands that you need to know in order to use the Package Manager Console. And then we'll conclude with just a brief overview on how to install, uninstall and update Nuget Packages. The exact same operations that we handled in the -- using the dialogue, we'll just translate that knowledge into the Package Manager Console.

Publishing Packages
John: This is John Petersen of Pluralsight and in this module we're going to talk about publishing your NuGet Packages. At this point you have gone through the process of examining the contents of what makes up a NuGet Package. What Nuget Packages are and how to create them. But, the next step is to make them available to the world at large to take advantage of the code that you've written. So in this module, I'm going to cover how to establish a NuGet Gallery Account. The NuGet Gallery, this is the official public NuGet feed, NuGet. org. I'm going to take you through the process of creating your own account and we'll look at those account details for the things that make it possible for you to publish and make available NuGet packages. And then, once that account has been established, we'll go ahead and run through the process of publishing a package with the NuGet Package Explorer. In this module I'm also going to take the opportunity to introduce you to another tool called the NuGet Command Line Tool. It itself is distributed as a NuGet Package. It's somewhat similar to the NuGet Package Manager power-shell console that we covered earlier in this course, but this command line tool actually allows you to handle a variety of tasks that the power-shell console does. The one thing the power-shell console doesn't allow you to do is to publish packages from that interface. The NuGet Command Line Tool does. And I'll use that as an example of how use the command line tool. And then, finally we'll conclude the module with actually publishing a package with the command line tool.